FAST-FOR­WARD TO 2013, IS THERE AN AVER­AGE TOOTH PRICE THAT THE TOOTH FAIRY PAYS IN SOUTH AFRICA?

Finweek English Edition - - MONEY -

There didn’t seem to be any for­mal sur­vey data about this. So I con­ducted an in­for­mal poll among par­ents in our net­work with chil­dren of teeth-los­ing age. Here are the in­ter­est­ing re­sults that emerged. The range seems to lie be­tween R10 and R100, with the aver­age sit­ting around R50.

So my son’s claim (that he was get­ting paid the least out of his friends) did seem to be cor­rect. How­ever, bear in mind that many of the par­ents we polled send t heir chil­dren to pri­vate schools i n Jo’burg North­ern sub­urbs, where it is fair to as­sume the aver­age is higher than in other, less aff lu­ent ar­eas of South Africa. So al­though R10 per tooth may be at the bot­tom end of the Jozi pri­vate school scale, it prob­a­bly isn’t at the bot­tom end else­where in SA. And this is what we have to keep re­mind­ing our chil­dren.

Oth­er­wise, if you’re one of the more gen­er­ous par­ents pay­ing R100 per tooth, a mouth­ful of 20 baby teeth will set you back an whop­ping R2 000 per child! In­ter­est­ingly, a few SA par­ents paid more for the f irst tooth than oth­ers, but this was the ex­cep­tion rather than the rule, un­like in the US. There were also cul­tural dif­fer­ences, with many Afrikaans fam­i­lies talk­ing about a tand­muis (tooth mouse); a tooth fairy seems to be the An­glo-Saxon ver­sion. One mother said: “As a gen­eral con­sen­sus among the par­ents, the kids in my child’s class get the amount equiv­a­lent to their age.” My per­sonal favourite was the fa­ther who tells his chil­dren that the tooth fairy pays sig­nif­i­cantly more for a per­fect tooth than for one with cav­i­ties, in that way re­ward­ing their chil­dren for good den­tal hy­giene.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.