Five ways to be re­silient in the work­place

RE­SILIENCE IS THE ABIL­ITY TO OVER­COME CRISES OR BOUNCE BACK FROM DIF­FI­CULT TIMES AND STRESSES.

Finweek English Edition - - INSIGHT - BY WIL­LIE VISSER ed­i­to­rial@fin­week.co.za Dr Wil­lie Visser is the di­rec­tor of the Cen­tre for Pos­i­tive Peo­ple @ Work, pro­vid­ing thought lead­er­ship, re­search and prac­ti­cal im­ple­men­ta­tion in em­ployee en­gage­ment.

The work­place of to­day is of­ten inf used with fast- paced change, un­cer­tainty, com­plex­ity and stress. There are the pres­sures of work back­logs, de­mand­ing clients and lin­ger­ing threats of restruc­tur­ing that bring job in­se­cu­rity and the ac­com­pa­ny­ing fi­nan­cial im­pli­ca­tions of los­ing an in­come.

Welcome to the mod­ern work­place. All these kinds of sit­u­a­tions ask for some kind of adap­tive re­sponse, which might – if the blows all come at the same time – re­duce your abil­ity to deal with them.

How do you keep conf ident and mo­ti­vated with­out be­ing over­whelmed and be­ing un­able to per­form?

This i s where resi l ience comes into play. Re­silience is the abil­ity to over­come crises or bounce back from dif­fi­cult times and stresses. It is about re­spond­ing with in­ner strength to the de­mands; an abil­ity to ab­sorb tur­moil, to stay com­pe­tent while at the same time re­new­ing your­self.

THINGS THAT WILL HELP TO THRIVE DUR­ING DIF­FI­CULT CIR­CUM­STANCES ARE:

1 Stay pos­i­tive and op­ti­mistic even though things are not go­ing as you would like them to go.

Op­ti­mistic and pos­i­tive peo­ple have a pos­i­tive and hope­ful view of the fu­ture and they ex­pect that things will work out well in the end.

2 Face your hard­ships.

Do not shy away from your prob­lems, but rather face up to them even though they seem un­pleas­ant at the time. Make a de­lib­er­ate choice to do some­thing about your dif­fi­cult sit­u­a­tion, while at the same time en­sur­ing that your emo­tions do not be­come neg­a­tive.

3 Be de­ter­mined.

Refuse to ac­cept fail­ure as an op­tion and per­se­vere even when you ex­pe­ri­ence some set­backs. Face and deal with the ob­sta­cles that come your way, one by one.

4 One of the most im­por­tant skills of re­silient peo­ple is that they do not get in­volved in neg­a­tive think­ing pat­terns about them­selves and the prob­lems that they face.

Do not ru­mi­nate about your prob­lems. Make an ac­tive choice to stop moan­ing and groan­ing about them.

5 Seek out the sup­port of your friends and fam­ily.

If peo­ple com­plain too much about their prob­lems, they will cut them­selves off from a po­ten­tial pro­tec­tive fac­tor, namely f ind­ing some form of so­cial sup­port. They rather lis­ten to other peo­ple’s per­spec­tives on what can pos­si­bly be done to re­solve t heir prob­lems. Re­mem­ber the ex­pres­sion: “Mis­ery likes com­pany, but com­pany does not like mis­ery.”

THE NEXT TIME YOU ARE IN A TIGHT SPOT, ASK YOUR­SELF THE FOL­LOW­ING:

Am I stay­ing pos­i­tive and op­ti­mistic about this sit­u­a­tion – what can I do to stay pos­i­tive and op­ti­mistic?

What small step can I take to solve this prob­lem right now? Do­ing some­thing, how­ever small, will give hope and mo­ti­va­tion to carry on.

Do I be­lieve that things will work out well in the end?

Am I de­ter­mined to over­come this prob­lem?

Do I com­plain about my cur­rent prob­lems?

Do I have a good friend to talk to about the sit­u­a­tion that I am fac­ing?

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