THERE SEEM TO BE A LOT OF WOMEN EN­TER­ING THE TECH-EN­TRE­PRE­NEUR­IAL IN­DUS­TRY. DO YOU THINK IT IS EAS­IER NOW

Finweek English Edition - - TOP WOMEN -

out­side Pre­to­ria. This led to a part­ner­ship with Telkom SA where tech­nol­ogy was em­ployed to de­liver the train­ing to learn­ers at these newly formed cam­puses. Soon af­ter, Telkom of­fered me a po­si­tion within its cor­po­rate cus­tomer di­vi­sion. It was a great start­ing point and a spring­board for many high­lights to come. and a wife, I do be­lieve that so­ci­ety needs to en­cour­age peo­ple to chal­lenge tra­di­tional no­tions and recog­nise the con­tri­bu­tion that ev­ery in­di­vid­ual, male or fe­male, can make to the work­place. The best ad­vice for any­one is to fol­low your dreams and work hard at them. For women in par­tic­u­lar, I would say don’t let any­thing or any­one hold you back. I base my life on the “CSR” prin­ci­ple, which stands for com­pe­tence, sin­cer­ity and re­li­a­bil­ity. If you ap­ply and dis­play these val­ues, you will achieve suc­cess per­son­ally and pro­fes­sion­ally. In 2000 I worked as a tem­po­rary ed­u­ca­tor, house­keeper and hair­styl­ist, and had be­gun to for­get my dream of go­ing to univer­sity. I was study­ing at Non­goma FET do­ing an N4 cer­tifi­cate in public re­la­tions, but one month I didn’t have money for bus tick­ets to travel be­tween Ulundi and Non­goma. I hitch­hiked and one of the driv­ers who picked me up was a young black fe­male engi­neer. She told me the story of how she made it, and six months af­ter meet­ing her I reg­is­tered as a first-year stu­dent at the Univer­sity of Zu­l­u­land. She didn’t change my cir­cum­stances, she changed my per­cep­tions of my cir­cum­stances, and that was the break I needed.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.