IN­TER­VEN­TIONS THAT HAVE TRA­DI­TION­ALLY BEEN USED TO IN­CREASE YOUTH EM­PLOY­MENT BUT HAVE NOT HAD A SIG­NIF­I­CANT ENOUGH EF­FECT:

Finweek English Edition - - In Depth Youth Unemployment - SOURCE: CDE

1. Pro­tec­tion­ist mea­sures that seek to en­sure that lo­cal jobs are taken up by lo­cal peo­ple;

2. Train­ing pro­grammes, whether for hard or soft skills, a qual­i­fi­ca­tion or workreadi­ness skills;

3. Job search and match­ing in­ter­ven

tions, such as those that seek to im­prove the ef­fi­ciency of the labour mar­ket, make in­for­ma­tion more widely avail­able, or help job­seek­ers find jobs more quickly;

4. Public em­ploy­ment pro­grammes, such as the Ex­panded Public Works Pro­gramme (EPWP);

5. En­trepreneur­ship pro­mo­tion, which seeks to help young peo­ple start their own busi­nesses; and

6. Wage sub­si­dies, which use public funds to re­duce the costs of em­ploy­ing peo­ple or to in­crease their take-home pay.

“While al­most all have their mer­its, the ca­pac­ity of each to ex­pand its cur­rent im­pact on youth em­ploy­ment is lim­ited,” the CDE re­port stated. “In­deed, to the ex­tent that some do have the po­ten­tial to make a big im­pact, they al­ready con­sume sig­nif­i­cant re­sources and are un­likely to be able to ex­pand dra­mat­i­cally with­out se­ri­ous con­se­quences for the qual­ity of the work they do.”

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