En­dive Bit­ter never tasted this good

If you’ve never heard of Bel­gian en­dive, let alone tasted it, al­low our easy recipes to in­tro­duce you to one of the tasti­est, most ver­sa­tile and health­i­est sur­prises your tongue will en­counter this year. Fresh or cooked. Hot or cold.

go! Platteland - - CONTENTS - RECIPES AND STYLING ALETTA LINTVELT PHOTOS MY­BURGH DU PLESSIS FOOD AS­SIS­TANT CLAIRE GOODERSON

Bel­gian or French en­dive is dif­fi­cult to grow (we ex­plain how on page 94), which is the only rea­son why this vegetable, also called chicory, is for­eign ter­ri­tory for many South Africans. Fresh en­dive is crisp, with a sweet, nutty flavour and a very light bit­ter­ness that al­most dis­ap­pears once it’s been cooked. Apart from the sig­nif­i­cant amounts of fi­bre, vi­ta­mins B1, B6 and B9, as well as potas­sium and cal­cium it con­tains, you’ll find it dif­fi­cult to think of a more ver­sa­tile stal­wart in the kitchen: fresh or cooked; hot or cold; whole or shred­ded; in soup, salad, stir-fries; served with rich cheeses, creamy dress­ings, nuts, fresh berries, cit­rus fruit… Start ex­per­i­ment­ing to­day.

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