MISSED PUTTS

A mini-his­tory of rims and sti­fled grins

Golf Digest (South Africa) - - Contents - BY CLIFF SCHROCK

Ev­ery putt breaks right for some­body.

IF we had any de­cency, what we would feel most is sym­pa­thy, not hap­pi­ness, at an­other’s mis­for­tune. But many emo­tions are boil­ing un­der the quiet at­mos­phere at a putting green. Give PGA Tour player Matt Ev­ery credit for be­ing forth­right im­me­di­ately af­ter his Bay Hill vic­tory last March, when he shared what he was think­ing as Hen­rik Sten­son at­tempted a birdie putt on 18 that would have tied him: You’re al­ready in (the Masters). Miss it. I need to get in. What fol­lows are the no­table misses that made some­body – or in some cases, sev­eral golfers – happy.Whether they ad­mit it or not.

1946 Masters

Ben Ho­gan can earn his first ma­jor vic­tory if he sinks a 12-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole. But he runs the ball 30 inches past. He misses the come­back, mak­ing Her­man Keiser the happy win­ner.

1970 Open

Doug San­ders has a three-foot, slid­ing-right par putt to win. From the mo­ment he first soles the put­ter, it takes him 25 sec­onds to putt. The miss to the right causes com­men­ta­tor Henry Longhurst to im­mor­tally in­tone, “And there but for the grace of God . . . ” San­ders loses to Jack Nick­laus in the play­off the next day by one shot.

1983 Open

This one took an ex­tra day to de­liver the punch line: Go­ing le handed, Hale Ir­win whiffs a twoinch tap-in at the 14th hole in the third round, mak­ing bo­gey, then fin­ishes se­cond by one shot the next day to Tom Wat­son.

1989 Masters

Scott Hoch has a two-foot putt for par on No 10, the first in a sud­den-death play­off, to beat Nick Faldo. But the putt slides past on the le . Faldo birdies No 11 to win.

1991 Ry­der Cup

Bring­ing plea­sure to the US team, there was no chance for deco­rum a er Bern­hard Langer misses a six-foot par putt on 18 in his sin­gles match with Hale Ir­win. Their match is halved, and the US team wins the cup by a point.

2001 US Open

A trio of play­ers are in a give­away mood on the last hole: Mark Brooks three-putts (the se­cond from six feet) for bo­gey. Ste­wart Cink misses from two feet to make a dou­ble bo­gey. Retief Goosen three-putts from 12 feet. The re­sult is a tie be­tween Goosen and Brooks, which Goosen breaks the next day in a play­off.

2007 Masters

Even­tual win­ner Zach John­son misses a two-foot par putt at 16 in the se­cond round. Be­cause the 10-shot rule is in ef­fect, the cut moves to eight over par. This pleases 15 play­ers, par­tic­u­larly even­tual run­ner-up Retief Goosen.

2009 BMW Cham­pi­onship

With a trip to the Tour Cham­pi­onship as­sured if he two putts for bo­gey on the fi­nal hole, Brandt Snedeker in­stead four putts, al­low­ing John Sen­den to take the last spot in the 30-man FedEx Cup fi­nale.

2012 Kra Nabisco

Just mo­ments away from be­ing able to jump into Poppy’s Pond in vic­tory, I K Kim in­stead rims out a one-foot putt for par on 18. She falls into a tie with Sun Young Yoo, who wins in a play­off.

2013 Her­itage

With the se­cond round de­layed to Satur­day morn­ing be­cause of rain, Jes­per Parnevik fin­ishes by miss­ing a five-footer for par. His ex­tra shot moves the cut line from one over par to two over, al­low­ing 21 more play­ers to play two more rounds for a record-ty­ing 91 week­end play­ers. Mark Wil­son and Trevor Im­mel­man take the most ad­van­tage and end up tied for ninth.

AN­GUISH & CEL­E­BRA­TION:

BERN­HARD LANGER’S MISS ON THE

FI­NAL HOLE OF THE 1991 RY­DER

CUP AT KI­AWAH IS­LAND LED TO

THE US TEAM CEL­E­BRA­TION BY

COREY PAVIN, MARK O’MEARA, DAVE

STOCK­TON AND PAYNE STE­WART.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from South Africa

© PressReader. All rights reserved.