HOW TO COOK

THIS AU­TUMN, LEARN HOW TO JAM, PICKLE, IN­FUSE, DRY AND FER­MENT (IT’S SIM­PLE, RE­ALLY) THE END OF SUM­MER’S MAR­KET-FRESH GLORY. WE PROM­ISE YOU’LL BE SAVOUR­ING THE BOUNTY WELL INTO WIN­TER

Gourmet (South Africa) - - CONTENTS - TEXT ALI­SON RO­MAN PHO­TO­GRAPHS EVA KOLENKO IL­LUS­TRA­TIONS JU­LIA ROTH­MAN

Mas­ter­ing pre­serves, pick­les and kim­chi

JAM

Why make your own jam? It’s a sim­ple way to use up any bumper crop of fruit, and it’s a no-brainer DIY gift. But we like it most be­cause it lets us con­trol the level of sweet­ness in the fi­nal prod­uct. For peak jam­mi­ness, choose fruit that’s at its height but not overly ripe; older fruit has lower acid and less pectin, which yields a runny jam that will bum out any piece of toast.

WHAT WE MEAN WHEN WE SAY…

Jam: Chopped fruit is cooked with sugar to get a chunky, rel­a­tively thick re­sult. (To make jelly, the cooked mix­ture is passed through a jelly bag.) Pectin: It’s what causes jam and jelly to gel. Nat­u­rally oc­cur­ring in lots of fruit, es­pe­cially grapes, ap­ples, cherries and cit­rus, you can also buy it in pow­dered form. Set: How firm (stiff) or soft (spread­able) the pre­serve is.

RASP­BERRY-ROSE JAM

Makes 950g

Spe­cial equip­ment Two 470ml can­ning jars or four 230g can­ning jars with lids

900g rasp­ber­ries 11/2 cups sugar 1T fresh lemon juice 1/4t rose wa­ter

1. Toss the rasp­ber­ries and sugar in a large, heavy-bot­tomed pot. Let it sit un­til the rasp­ber­ries start to re­lease their juice, 20 to 30 min­utes. 2. Cook over a medium heat, stir­ring oc­ca­sion­ally at first and then more of­ten as the mix­ture thick­ens (as the sug­ars con­cen­trate, the jam will be more likely to scorch), un­til most of the liq­uid evap­o­rates and the mix­ture thick­ens, 30 to 40 min­utes. Test the thick­ness of the cooked mix­ture (see box on right). 3. Re­move from the heat and stir in the lemon juice and rose wa­ter. Di­vide be­tween the jars, cover and chill.

Do ahead Jam can be made 2 months ahead. Keep cov­ered and chilled.

Also try it with Black­ber­ries and orange-blos­som wa­ter.

Kitchen tip Com­bine the fruit and sugar a few hours ahead to draw out the liq­uid so the fruit sim­mers, not caramelises.

APRI­COT-RIES­LING JAM

Makes 950g

1kg apri­cots, halved, pit­ted 2 cups sugar

1/2 cup Ries­ling

1. Com­bine the apri­cots, sugar and Ries­ling in a large, heavy­bot­tomed pot, stir­ring to dis­solve the sugar. Let it sit un­til the apri­cots start to re­lease their juice, 20 to 30 min­utes. 2. Cook over a medium heat, stir­ring oc­ca­sion­ally at first and then more of­ten as the mix­ture be­gins to thicken, un­til most of the liq­uid evap­o­rates and the mix­ture thick­ens, 30 to 40 min­utes. Test thick­ness (see box on right), di­vide be­tween the jars, cover and chill.

Also try it with Peaches and dry white wine or plums and red wine.

This rasp­berry-rose jam will brighten up your toast, yo­ghurt, scone — you name it

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