Com­mu­nity meet­ings con­tinue

Grocott's Mail - - NEWS -

From Page 5

re­sponse to the cur­rent cri­sis, along with mu­nic­i­pal coun­cil­lors and the po­lice, have been called to ad­dress the com­mu­nity meet­ings.

The sched­ule for the rest of the week is as fol­lows:

Thurs­day 29 Oc­to­ber at 4.30pm: Tan­tyi Hall and May­field (tent); Fri­day at 4.30pm: No­luthando Hall and Ex­ten­sion 9 Hall.

There will be a mass meet­ing at 1pm on Sun­day at the In­door Sports Cen­tre in Ex­ten­sion 6, which ac­com­mo­dates 3 000 peo­ple.

At 1pm on Fri­day, a group of women dis­placed by the loot­ing and in­tim­i­da­tion will stage a protest in front of the City Hall. They list eight de­mands that in­clude deal­ing with the xeno­pho­bic out­burst in Gra­ham­stown, as well as gen­er­ally im­prov­ing so­cio-eco­nomic con­di­tions, and for coun­cil­lors to stop "di­vid­ing peo­ple”.

Truth from fic­tion

Speak­ing about this week’s meet­ings, ANC sub­re­gional chairperson Mab­huti Matyumza said at­ten­dance had been good so far.

How­ever, Matyumza says peo­ple want to be in a po­si­tion to be able to sep­a­rate truth from fic­tion.

“They want to know if this is true or not, most of them can see that they have been mis­led by who­ever is mis­lead­ing them,” he said.

Matyumza said it was clear that peo­ple had dif­fer­ent con­cerns with re­gard to the cur­rent sit­u­a­tion.

“The re­al­ity is that there are peo­ple who have their own griev­ances. Some say they don’t want them to come back and there are those who say they want them back be­cause they have left a big gap,” he said.

Speak­ing about the Seven Foun­tains meet­ing, Matyumza said the turn out was good.

“It was very well at­tended and well ar­tic­u­lated by the po­lice in terms of the mixed feel­ings that are out there,” he said.

Matyumza said peo­ple there said they were not aware that they had been lied to [ie that a false ru­mour had been spread] and ad­mit­ted that they owe an apol­ogy to the for­eign na­tion­als.

“The meet­ing agreed through the sta­tion com­man­der that he would fa­cil­i­tate a meet­ing be­tween him­self and the shop own­ers.”

Matyumza said most of the peo­ple at the BB Zon­dani meet­ing wanted the dis­placed res­i­dents to come back.

“But the younger peo­ple, for their own per­sonal rea­sons, don't want them to come back,” he said.

“The com­mu­nity of that area is much calmer now,” Matyumza said. “At least they are able to say th­ese peo­ple must come back, be­cause they can see this thing was or­ches­trated,” he said.

Matyumza said the Hoogge­noeg meet­ing hadn’t gone as well as the other meet­ings. Matyumza says he chaired that meet­ing, but the peo­ple weren't happy with the po­lice con­tri­bu­tion to it.

“Ac­cord­ing to the peo­ple, they couldn’t re­spond in a man­ner that sat­is­fied them,” he said.

Matyumza said the next phase would be a pro­gramme to rein­te­grate the res­i­dents into the com­mu­nity.

Matyumza said the events of this week should be seen as a learn­ing ex­pe­ri­ence.

“You have struc­tures like the com­mu­nity polic­ing fo­rums,” he said. “That’s why peo­ple were call­ing for the CPFs to be re­in­forced.”

The re­al­ity is that there are peo­ple who have their own

griev­ances. Some say they don't want them to come back and there are those who say they want them back be­cause they have

left a big gap

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