GOOD FATS VS BAD FATS

There are nu­tri­tional and health dan­gers hid­den in some polyun­sat­u­rated fats. Where does the prob­lem lie and what can you do to pro­tect your­self?

LOSE IT! - - Contents -

Pro­tect your­self with the right choices

wenow know we have been mis­led for decades about sat­u­rated fat be­ing ‘deadly’ but we have also been mis­led about polyun­sat­u­rated fats (PUFAs). Th­ese have been pro­moted as ev­ery­thing from heart healthy to slimming but it ap­pears noth­ing could be fur­ther from the truth. Shock­ingly, up to 62% of the Stan­dard Amer­i­can Diet (and prob­a­bly the stan­dard South African diet!) is made up of PUFAs so we need to look at this.

We al­ready know, as low-car­bers, that sat­u­rated fatty acids (SFAs) from an­i­mal fats and co­conut oil are not harm­ful – so where do mo­noun­sat­u­rated fatty acids (MUFAs) and PUFAs fit in?

Chem­i­cally MUFAs and PUFAs are very sim­i­lar but there’s a slight dif­fer­ence in the struc­ture of their mol­e­cules, which changes what they do.

You will find MUFAs in red meat, whole milk prod­ucts, olives, av­o­ca­dos, nuts and olive oil, which boasts around 75% MUFAs. Olive oil is an ex­cel­lent source, with nat­u­rally oc­cur­ring vi­ta­min E, which has a pos­i­tive ef­fect on both heart health and ben­e­fi­cial high-den­sity lipopro­teins (HDL), while low­er­ing ex­ces­sive low-den­sity lipopro­teins (LDL). The omega-9 fatty acids present in MUFAs are not ‘es­sen­tial fats’ – the body is able to make them if needed but, of course, MUFArich types of food are also rich in other

You will find MUFAs in red meat, whole milk prod­ucts, olives, av­o­ca­dos, nuts and olive oil.

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