BODY POL­I­TICS

THE MC BEAUTY ED HELPS YOU FIND YOUR SKIN’S BAL­ANCE

Marie Claire (South Africa) - - CONTENTS - WORDS MATHAHLE STOFILE WORDS AS­PA­SIA KAR­RAS

ERKE sportwear; ro­man­tic get­away; the selfie

it’s amaz­ing how many of us go through this rou­tine: you care­fully ap­ply your make-up in the morn­ing, tak­ing care not to overdo it be­cause you know the tem­per­a­ture may fluc­tu­ate later. You even carry your sexy pow­der com­pact with you so that you can touch up those shiny spots dur­ing the day. You take all these pre­cau­tions yet, some­how, you al­ways end up with an un­sightly shine on your fore­head, nose and chin. It’s an­noy­ing, not to men­tion em­bar­rass­ing.

This doesn’t just hap­pen to us mere mor­tals. I’ve come to no­tice that even some of the most well-groomed women, who travel with glam squads in Hol­ly­wood, too have their mo­ments of shine, so to speak: Gwyneth Pal­trow, Cameron Diaz, Vanessa Wil­liams, Jes­sica Alba, all of the Kar­dashi­ans and even Bey­oncé! Lo­cally (al­though we mainly suf­fer from the ‘shiny lip’ syn­drome as a lip gloss-ob­sessed na­tion), Ms Thuli Madon­sela (as much as I love what she’s about) must surely take the prize when it comes to the shiny face. It hap­pens. And you’re not al­ways aware of it un­til you step in front of the mir­ror. I’m sure I’ve been guilty of it, too.

But, did you know that there are brands ded­i­cated to this lit­tle phe­nom­e­non? Black Up, for ex­am­ple, is a French brand cre­ated by an African make-up artist work­ing in Paris, who was fed up with the lack of op­tions that black mod­els faced when it came to skin care and make-up. The whole range of their prod­ucts ad­dresses ‘the shine fac­tor’, as it is very com­mon, al­though not exclusive to us melanin-pro­duc­ing skin types (black skins) – so, Black Up’s prod­ucts will al­ways leave your skin with a matte fin­ish. If you still en­joy a bit of a glow and don’t want to go down the all-matte route, try some blot­ting pa­pers. These are eas­ily car­ried in your purse and can be used through­out the day.

A good pow­der com­pact that comes with its own brush is also al­ways a win­ner, but don’t use it all over the face! Only ap­ply strate­gi­cally on the nec­es­sary ar­eas. Chanel’s Les Beiges Healthy Glow Sheer Pow­der SPF 15 is great for tak­ing away the shine while still leav­ing you with a soft glow. Plus, the pack­ag­ing is only a plea­sure to take out in pub­lic. Here are five re­ally good prod­ucts that will help you curb this lit­tle shine prob­lem…

KEEN TO RID YOUR PINS FROM PESKY AND UN­SIGHTLY VEINS? MC EDI­TOR AS­PA­SIA KAR­RAS VIS­ITS LASER­DERM, ONE OF JO’BURG’S TOP MED­I­CAL AES­THET­ICS CLIN­ICS, IN SEARCH OF THE MOST EF­FEC­TIVE TREAT­MENTS

dr Lawrence Retief is sit­ting on the floor of his con­sult­ing rooms with his knees raised, demon­strat­ing the best rest­ing po­si­tion for the hu­man. He is ex­plain­ing that we’d ideally be sit­ting like our sib­lings, the apes, had our evo­lu­tion­ary path not led to our bipedal up­right walk­ing, and that one part of our phys­i­ol­ogy has not kept up with the pro­gramme. Our veins.

Ap­par­ently our veins still op­er­ate as if we were lop­ing about on our knuck­les.And this, as any­one who has born wit­ness to the sud­den ap­pear­ance of lit­tle red spi­der veins or more se­ri­ous flare-ups of blue vari­cose de­lights, is not quite what we ex­pected of the old ve­nous sys­tem.

Dr Retief ex­plains that the pur­pose of our veins is to pump blood back from the body’s ex­trem­i­ties to our heart. Most of the pump­ing hap­pens deep in­side the body, and not in the sur­face veins that we can see with the naked eye. And, be­cause our veins have not caught up with our up­right stance, our sur­face veins are pump­ing a small per­cent­age of blood com­pared to, say, that of our do­mes­tic dogs. Our evo­lu­tion­ary trap is what leads to grav­ity col­laps­ing valves in­side the veins that should be aiding and abet­ting our ve­nous blood flow. Then blood pools in the leg veins, cre­at­ing the afore­men­tioned un­sightly sit­u­a­tions.

WHAT TO DO?

Dr Retief scans and lis­tens to your veins with all sorts of fancy equip­ment and a Dop­pler ul­tra­sound. He may also use a more de­tailed du­plex scan for some very se­ri­ous ‘Ve­nous Map­ping’, if the ul­tra­sound shows a more deep-seated prob­lem, and then he pre­scribes a se­ries of in­ter­ven­tions. For spi­der veins and the big­ger, blue feed­ing veins, the good doc­tor is a fan of Scle­rother­apy. This is the in­jec­tion of dif­fer­ent so­lu­tions into the veins (depend­ing on the size and con­cen­tra­tion of the veins) that pro­vokes in­flam­ma­tion of the faulty vein, which even­tu­ally grows closed and cleans up the mess. In skilled and ex­pe­ri­enced hands, cer­tain cases may re­spond to laser treat­ment that ba­si­cally zaps the lit­tle bug­gers into line. I am un­der­go­ing a se­ries of in­ter­ven­tions at the hand of the bril­liant In­grid du Plessis. She is clear­ing up some patches of nas­ties I was born with and dis­plays the pa­tience of Job and the skill of a ninja mas­ter. It is mirac­u­lous re­ally, when you see some­thing you thought you’d be stuck with for­ever sim­ply dis­ap­pear.

For the big­ger, bulging vari­cose veins, Dr Retief, depend­ing on the find­ings of the du­plex scan, of­ten rec­om­mends En­dove­nous Ra­dioFre­quency Abla­tion. Al­though this is a sur­gi­cal pro­ce­dure, it doesn’t re­quire a gen­eral anaes­thetic and is done in his rooms by a vas­cu­lar sur­geon skilled in this new tech­nol­ogy. A small catheter is placed in your vein through a punc­ture in the skin. The catheter is pow­ered by ra­dio fre­quency and heats the vein wall, thus shrink­ing it un­til the vein is sealed and closed.You will be able to re­sume nor­mal ac­tiv­i­ties within a day or two. For the lit­tle veins on the face, specif­i­cally around the nose and on the cheeks, Dr Retief also rec­om­mends skilled laser, al­though some­times Scle­rother­apy is nec­es­sary for the pesky ones. He is clear that Elec­tro­cautery of the veins is not ef­fec­tive and of­ten re­sults in per­ma­nent mark­ing of the skin.

We can def­i­nitely clear up our un­sightly veins given a lit­tle pa­tience and for­ti­tude. But Dr Retief has two pro­vi­sos for the treat­ment. 1. You need a se­ries of treat­ments (the veins will come back, but not as pur­pose­fully), with ‘tidy­ing up’ ev­ery two to three years. Reg­u­lar fol­low-ups will keep you in shorts for life. 2. Sit with your knees raised, to take the pres­sure off your veins, es­pe­cially if you are desk-bound or watch­ing TV. AVER­AGE COST BREAK­DOWN: Ini­tial as­sess­ment: R750. Scle­rother­apy for blue veins, thread veins, spi­der veins: R1 200. Vein­wave for fa­cial spi­ders: R95 per minute. Laser­derm-sa.com; 011-341-0580

BLACK UP MI­CRO­DER­MABRA­SION CHAUFFANTE UL­TRA-EX­FO­LI­AT­ING CREAM WITH MI­CRO-CRYS­TALS, R690. CHANEL LES BEIGES HEALTHY GLOW SHEER POW­DER SPF 15, R680. NEU­TRO­GENA OIL-FREE MOIS­TURE SPF 15, R95. MAC BLOT FILM, R180 FOR 30 SHEETS. NIVEA VIS­AGE DAILY ES­SEN­TIALS SHINE CON­TROL MOIS­TUR­IS­ING DAY CREAM SPF 15, R60.

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