SEX RE­PORT

Randy ro­bots, drone bon­ing and DNA dat­ing… What’s really up next for our sex lives? CORINNE RED­FERN sep­a­rates the facts from the fan­tasies

Marie Claire (South Africa) - - NEWS -

Sex: the fi­nal fron­tier

RU­MOUR

WE WON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT CON­TRA­CEP­TION…

TRUTH Men will have to in­stead. In the next three to four years, a non­hor­monal male con­tra­cep­tive called Vasal­gel is ex­pected to hit the mar­ket. In re­gards to tim­ing, we an­tic­i­pate start­ing our rst clin­i­cal trial in mid- , and then a larger trial start­ing in , says inda rent, deputy di­rec­tor of the Parse­mus Foun­da­tion. ‘When the prod­uct ar­rives on the mar­ket de­pends mostly on reg­u­la­tory ap­provals, ut it could e as soon as . ut you don t need to worry about whether your other half can be trusted to re­mem­ber to take the male ‘pill . Vasal­gel is an in ec­tion that blocks a man s sperm. e won t even have to bother set­ting a re­minder on his phone.

RU­MOUR WE’LL PICK OUR PART­NERS BY THEIR DNA…

TRUTH nd then we ll break up with them shortly af­ter­wards. Ad­vance­ments in ge­net­ics mean that dat­ing apps could be launched where you match with part­ners based on DNA suit­abil­ity rather than per­son­al­ity. ut ex­perts reckon they re more gim­micky than any­thing else. ‘ enetic dat­ing is based on your im­mune sys­tem, says psy­chol­o­gist o em­mings. ‘ f course, it s handy to have a healthy part­ner, but that has noth­ing to do with at­trac­tion, lust or love. There are so many other en­vi­ron­men­tal fac­tors go­ing on in both chem­istry and com­pat­i­bil­ity, such as life­style, age, goals, hu­mour, in­tel­lect and looks, that your DNA is pretty ir­rel­e­vant.

RU­MOUR

WE’LL BE SLEEP­ING WITH RO­BOTS…

TRUTH nown as ‘robophilia , hav­ing sex with a robot sounds de­press­ing at best and creepy at worst. ut Dr elen Driscoll from the niver­sity of un­der­land in the be­lieves it could be the norm by . ‘We tend to think about is­sues such as vir­tual re­al­ity and ro­botic sex within the con­text of cur­rent norms, she says. ‘ ut if we think back to the so­cial norms about sex that ex­isted ust years ago, it is ob­vi­ous that they have changed rapidly and rad­i­cally. Roxxxy and Rocky are the lat­est devel­op­ments in sex ro­bot­ics, and come com­plete with cus­tomis­able hair, eyes and com­plex­ion, plus a beat­ing heart, warm skin and cir­cu­la­tory sys­tem. ou can also ne-tune their per­son­al­i­ties, and they can even have their own or­gasms. ‘Our sex ro­bots pro­vide not only phys­i­cal in­ti­macy, but also the love and sup­port we all need, says their cre­ator, Dou­glas ines. e hopes the ro­bots will re­duce sex traf ck­ing, re­place the role of pros­ti­tutes, re­move the risk of STDs and dou­ble up as a train­ing tool for sex­ual ther­a­pists. osting about R , they re avail­able on­line and ap­par­ently men and women have al­ready stocked up.

RU­MOUR WE’LL BE US­ING DRONES TO FILM PORN…

TRUTH Prob­a­bly not. At the end of last year, ‘drone bon­ing be­came a porn search term, as the rst ever -rated movie de­buted as lmed from the skies. ut ohn ar­lucci, who made the lm, isn t con­vinced that it will, well, take off. ‘Don t ex­pect any close-ups from drone porn, be­cause those ro­tor blades can do some se­ri­ous dam­age, he says. ‘That said, there s some­thing sex­u­ally stim­u­lat­ing out there for ev­ery­one, and if you can get past the noise when you plea­sure your­self, it could work. As for the threat of be­ing lmed by a drone with­out re­al­is­ing it, he s keen to al­le­vi­ate any con­cerns. ‘Peo­ple with tele­photo lenses, binoc­u­lars and tele­scopes would be able to see more han­ky­panky than a drone, he says.

RU­MOUR

WE’LL BE VAC­CI­NATED AGAINST STIs…

TRUTH ou wish. Re­searchers from ar­vard Med­i­cal School have found that in ect­ing V light-killed chlamy­dia bac­te­ria into a mouse s uterus pro­duces an im­mune re­sponse that could pro­tect them against the live chlamy­dia virus an of­ten symp­tom­less STI in the fu­ture. ut there s still a very long way to go. ‘The tri­als that have taken place so far have been on mice, so while they have shown promis­ing re­sults, we re a long way off from a vac­cine be­ing de­vel­oped that could be safe and ef­fec­tive for hu­mans, says a spokesper­son for sex­ual health char­ity FPA. ‘ hlamy­dia is one of the most com­mon sex­u­ally trans­mit­ted in­fec­tions but it s im­por­tant to re­mem­ber a vac­cine would not pro­tect against other in­fec­tions.

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