AC­TI­VATED CHAR­COAL

Marie Claire (South Africa) - - BEAUTY -

Repur­pos­ing gro­ceries for use in your bath­room isn’t a new idea, but it is en­joy­ing a resur­gence. Look at the uptick of beauty tips on­line: co ee scrub to fade stretch marks, onion wa­ter to spur hair growth, yo­gurt face masks. Now, sev­eral cos­met­ics brands have latched on by de­vel­op­ing new prod­ucts with clas­sic kitchen in­gre­di­ents. So is it worth home-brew­ing, or should you go the ready-made route? I en­list my hus­band to give it a try. He re­ports his nor­mally oily skin feels ‘very clean’, and we both no­tice he’s more matte than usual. This por­ous pow­der is used to ab­sorb tox­ins, says El­iz­a­beth. ‘In beauty prod­ucts, it could draw de­bris and oil out of your skin or scalp,’ she says, but there’s no re­search to con rm this. So I be­come a one-woman study. Do it your­self: Be­sides the mess, the mask I make by mix­ing the jet-black pow­der avail­able at health shops with aloe vera doesn’t do my dry skin any favours. For a more moisturising ver­sion of the treat­ment, Joanna sug­gests adding sooth­ing yo­gurt and honey. Sounds promis­ing, but I’m too busy clean­ing my sink to go for round two – or to try the char­coal hair treat­ment I spot on­line. Leave it to the ex­perts: Der­ma­log­ica Char­coal Res­cue Mas ue clari es with char­coal and sul­phur and doesn’t leave my skin tight. And my thick curls bounce and shine af­ter I wash with char­coal-in­fused, residue-re­mov­ing Hask Char­coal Pu­ri­fy­ing Sham­poo.

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