HERE WE BREAK DOWN SOME COM­MON SCAMS:

Move! - - PROMOTION -

CARD SKIM­MING

Fraud­sters du­pli­cate your card de­tails us­ing skim­ming de­vices placed into the ATM card slot, swipe ma­chine or hand-held de­vice. They cap­ture your de­tails stored in the card’s mag­netic stripe while you make your trans­ac­tion, and use that to de­fraud you in dif­fer­ent ways.

TIPS TO AVOID CARD SKIM­MING

■ Never let your card out of sight when you trans­act ■ In­sist that the POS (point-of-sale) de­vices are brought to you ■ En­sure you get your own card back af­ter every trans­ac­tion ■ Sign up for My Up­dates to get your no­ti­fi­ca­tions of bank trans­ac­tions WARN­ING: En­quire with your bank if you no­tice any sus­pi­cious trans­ac­tions.

PHISH­ING

Pro­nounced “fish­ing”, it in­volves crim­i­nals fish­ing for your info - hop­ing you’ll take the bait. Crim­i­nals use fake links on web­sites or emails to trick you into giv­ing out your de­tails. Never click on an in­ter­net bank­ing lo­gin link in an email or SMS. Your bank will never ask you to lo­gin to ver­ify any in­for­ma­tion or au­tho­rise pay­ments via email or SMS.

TIPS TO AVOID PHISH­ING

■ Watch out for emails that cre­ate a false sense of ur­gency forc­ing you to act quickly - less time to think it through ■ Be mind­ful of emails sent from an un­usual sen­der ■ Don’t fall vic­tim to calls ask­ing you to con­firm bank­ing de­tails over the phone or via email WARN­ING: Con­sider it a red flag if any­body asks for your PIN or bank­ing de­tails, un­less you’re at a bank

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