Fuel like a leg­end

91-92

Runner's World South Africa - - Spring Shoe Buyer's Guide -

OLD SCHOOL FUEL GRETE WAITZ’S PB- RACE STEAK

On the eve of her first marathon, in 1978, Grete dined on steak, red wine and ice cream, ac­cord­ing to her hus­band, Jack. The next day she won her first of nine New York City marathons; a year later she be­came the first woman to run the marathon in un­der 2:30.

Sea­son a fil­let steak with salt and pep­per and cook over medium-high heat for 4 min­utes on each side. Plate up, and cover loosely with foil for 5 min­utes. Serve with pota­toes or rice, and an­tiox­i­dant-rich red wine.

NEW SCHOOL FUEL ELIUD KIPCHOGE’S PRE- RACE UGALI

Many of to­day’s top Kenyan ath­letes, such as Olympic Marathon cham­pion Eliud Kipchoge, fuel them­selves with a tra­di­tional meal of ugali (a corn­meal-based por­ridge) paired with eggs or meat, and greens.

Add 150g finely ground corn­meal to 350ml boil­ing wa­ter. Stir un­til thick, so por­ridge holds its shape, adding up to 120ml more wa­ter, as needed, to mois­ten the corn­meal with­out mak­ing it soupy. To repli­cate a full Kenyan meal, serve hot with sautéed kale and stewed mung beans.

93-

95 GO NUTS FOR A SIM­PLE SNACK UP­GRADE

If you find that you’re peck­ish be­tween your (in­vari­ably healthy) main meals, grab a hand­ful of al­monds, as re­search sug­gests the fi­bre in their skins may act as a pre­bi­otic, which will en­hance the ef­fect of pro­bi­otics (see 87-90, left).

And that’s not the only rea­son to choose this par­tic­u­lar type of nut: in a study pub­lished in the Jour­nal of Nu­tri­tion, sub­jects who ate 35g of al­monds per day over 12 weeks lost more to­tal fat and more vis­ceral adi­pose tis­sue (belly fat) than those on a diet with the same kilo­joules but no al­monds. The al­mond eaters also dis­played a sig­nif­i­cant de­crease in di­as­tolic blood pres­sure.

96 COACH CLASS

You might think that run­ning coaches are just for elite ath­letes. “Not so,” says coach Ja­son Fitzger­ald (strength­run­ning.com). “A coach, whether in per­son or on­line, can help you reach goals faster and safer than us­ing a stock plan or wing­ing it by your­self.”

Com­mon­wealth Games marathon bronze medal­list and two-time Olympian Liz Yelling (yelling­per­for­mance.com) agrees. “A coach not only pro­vides struc­ture, but can tailor the plan to­wards your goals, max­imis­ing train­ing pri­or­i­ties within your life­style and help­ing you bet­ter un­der­stand your per­sonal re­sponses to train­ing,” she says. The best coach­ing re­la­tion­ships are two-way: you have some­one to listen to you, and get feed­back from – some­thing you won’t get from a train­ing jour­nal. You’ll also have some­one else to blame when you find your­self wasted af­ter a par­tic­u­larly bru­tal train­ing ses­sion.

97- 98 SPEED DAT­ING

A date with a run­ning buddy is good news for your train­ing and mo­ti­va­tion, but what will help you more – run­ning with some­one you have to work hard to keep up with, or some­one who can’t match your pace? It all de­pends, says coach Jamie Ad­cock. “On easy or re­cov­ery days, it’s best to run with some­one whose com­pany you en­joy, who runs at your com­fort­able pace or a bit

slower,” says Ad­cock. “Try­ing to keep up with a faster run­ner dur­ing these runs would de­feat their pur­pose and leave you fa­tigued, and pos­si­bly in­jured. How­ever, when you’re do­ing speed work­outs or other hard ses­sions, your faster pal will keep you on pace to hit your tar­gets.”

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