CON­SER­VA­TION

SA Bass - - Contents -

“SACRAA Sur­vey Re­vealed” The South African Con­sol­i­dated Recre­ational An­gling As­so­ci­a­tion (SACRAA) has re­vealed that in 2017 to­tal spend­ing by an es­ti­mated 1.3 mil­lion recre­ational an­glers con­trib­uted R26.5 bil­lion to the econ­omy.

Amulti-dis­ci­plinary study by re­searchers from Rhodes, Cape Town and North-West Uni­ver­si­ties, the South African In­sti­tute for Aquatic Bio­di­ver­sity (SAIAB) and the Oceano­graphic Re­search In­sti­tute (ORI) on the eco­nomic im­pact of the recre­ational fish­ery in South Africa, which was re­cently com­mis­sioned by the South African Con­sol­i­dated Recre­ational An­gling As­so­ci­a­tion (SACRAA) has re­vealed that in 2017 to­tal spend­ing by an es­ti­mated 1.3 mil­lion recre­ational an­glers con­trib­uted R26.5 bil­lion to the econ­omy. The in­dus­try also sup­ported 94000 em­ploy­ment op­por­tu­ni­ties. The study was funded by the South African Fish­ing Tackle Agents and Dis­trib­u­tors (SAFTAD).

At a SACRAA con­fer­ence in­dus­try rep­re­sen­ta­tives, re­searchers and high pro­file ma­rine and fresh­wa­ter an­glers de­lib­er­ated on key is­sues fac­ing the cur­rent and fu­ture sta­tus of recre­ational fish­ing in the coun­try, in both coastal and in­land wa­ters.

The sec­tors within the econ­omy that benefit the most from recre­ational fish­ing are the man­u­fac­tur­ing and the trade, ac­com­mo­da­tion & cater­ing sec­tors (26.5 and 24.9% re­spec­tively). It was also es­ti­mated that a quar­ter of all recre­ational fish­ers come from low-in­come house­holds and that many use the fish they catch as a safety net to en­sure there is food on the ta­ble.

“These find­ings con­firm our be­lief that recre­ational fish­ing, in all its forms, is a valu­able con­trib­u­tor to our coun­try’s econ­omy and is also a sig­nif­i­cant creator of em­ploy­ment op­por­tu­ni­ties,”

says SACRAA chair­man Mr John Pledger.

“It is there­fore de­serv­ing of far more at­ten­tion and in­ter­ac­tion with the var­i­ous gov­ern­ment de­part­ments that have the man­date to man­age and reg­u­late it,” he adds.

SACRAA is rec­og­nized as an in­ter­est group in terms of Sec­tion 8 of the Ma­rine Liv­ing Re­sources Act (Act 18 of 1998) and will ap­ply also ap­ply for recog­ni­tion once the In­land Fish­eries Pol­icy is im­ple­mented via leg­is­la­tion. It is a non-profit as­so­ci­a­tion es­tab­lished in re­ac­tion to the limited level of recog­ni­tion of the recre­ational sec­tor and the lack of trans­parency and in­ter­ac­tion with the sec­tor by amongst oth­ers the Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture, Forestry & Fish­eries (DAFF), and out of con­cern for the de­clin­ing state of key an­gling species.

It is an in­de­pen­dent body that acts in the best in­ter­ests of its mem­bers and the recre­ational fish­ing in­dus­try. It is not af­fil­i­ated to any gov­ern­ment or other an­gling or­ga­ni­za­tions but has the sup­port of the South African Sport An­glers & Cast­ing Con­fed­er­a­tion (SASACC) and SAFTAD. *Ad­di­tional Sur­vey info: Prof Warren Potts, e-mail: w.potts@ ru.ac.za; Tel: (046) 6038415 *In­for­ma­tion re SACRAA: Mr John Pledger, E-mail: jpledger@iafrica.com; Tel: (011) 794-6950 *SACRAA - South African Con­sol­i­dated Recre­ational An­gling As­so­ci­a­tion. For more in­for­ma­tion on SACRAA and how you can be­come in­volved please visit their web­site at www.sacraa.co.za *SAFTAD Show (South African Fish­ing Tackle Agents and Dis­trib­u­tors)

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