TV star Ka­belo springs into a year of new be­gin­nings

Ac­tor picked up the pieces af­ter a ‘chaotic’ 2016

Sowetan - - Time Out - By Em­manuel Tjiya

Isidingo and The Queen ac­tor Ka­belo Moalusi is a new man.

He is the very quin­tes­sence of the lyrics “I’m born to love again” made fa­mous by Brooks & Dunn’s 1991 song Brand New Man.

Moalusi says 2017 has been a year of new be­gin­nings, pro­fes­sion­ally and per­son­ally. The fa­ther of two is the first to ad­mit that last year was “chaotic” be­cause of his di­vorce from his now ex-wife.

“2017 has been a fresh start. I think ev­ery­one should re­de­fine them­selves ev­ery five years. We were mar­ried for two years; we started separat­ing on the third and even­tu­ally fi­nalised the di­vorce on the fourth year.

“You look at your char­ac­ter. What could have caused cer­tain things to col­lapse? You can’t blame ev­ery­one. It was very dif­fi­cult, es­pe­cially com­ing from a fam­ily that has never ex­pe­ri­enced di­vorce.”

The 33-year-old star has man­aged to pick up the pieces, and has found love again.

“I met some­one else. I’m look­ing for a new life. Old wounds got healed, but there are les­sons.

“You have to ex­pe­ri­ence life as it comes. Even fall­ing in love af­ter get­ting di­vorced, I didn’t ex­pect it. You have to let things go and ac­cept things you can­not change,” he says.

On a cool spring morn­ing, Moalusi ar­rives on a mo­tor­bike, 20 min­utes early for our in­ter­view. It’s a rare virtue for an ac­tor, since many are prone to chronic late­ness.

He makes a great first im­pres­sion and it’s not only be­cause of his lead­ing man good looks. He ex­udes a freespir­ited charm, good sense of hu­mour and gen­eral lik­a­bil­ity. He’s un­guarded, self-ef­fac­ing and com­pletely un­aware of his celebrity sta­tus.

“I don’t en­joy the pub­lic at­mos­phere. That’s why I drive a bike. I hide my face and it gets me from point A to B,” he quips.

Moalusi is ready for his TV takeover as bad boy Ofentse Moloi on SABC3’s Isidingo.

When he’s not con­spir­ing with his con­niv­ing mother Baset­sana Moloi (Mot­shabi Tyelele), Ofentse is com­ing to blows with his cousin Sech­aba Mata­bane (Mot­latsi Mafat­she) or caus­ing vil­lain Barker Haines (Robert White­head) a car­diac ar­rest.

If he’s not wreak­ing havoc in fic­tional min­ing town Hori­zon Deep, Moalusi is pro­vid­ing some light comic re­lief as Roy Maake on Mzansi Magic te­len­ov­ela, The Queen.

“Isidingo is the first pro­duc­tion where I just fell into the sto­ry­line. I’m look­ing for­ward to how they open this char­ac­ter up,” he says ex­cit­edly.

Moalusi never dreamt of a ca­reer in act­ing. It was when he hit fi­nan­cial dif­fi­culty while study­ing that he tried act­ing for ex­tra cash.

Sub­se­quently, Moalusi got his first taste of fame on Back­stage in 2006.

Af­ter his stint on the show, he trav­elled the globe as a model, ap pear­ing in ad­verts for Coca-Cola USA, T-Mo­bile UK as well as Nokia.

He even­tu­ally set­tled down back home and joined Gen­er­a­tions: The Legacy in 2015 play­ing the char­ac­ter Siya Radebe.

“Cer­tain things that I saw on Gen­er­a­tions with other ac­tors, I didn’t agree with. Cer­tain peo­ple were en­gaged with other peo­ple, but they were do­ing stuff on the side,” he shares.

Born and bred in Kag­iso on the West Rand, Moalusi has a twin sis­ter, Ke­abetswe. Grow­ing up, he dab­bled in the prop­erty in­dus­try, which was a fam­ily busi­ness. He was ex­pected to be­come a re­al­tor.

When he is off­screen, Moalusi is an en­tre­pre­neur, run­ning con­struc­tion com­pany Tl­habaki Projects – which is named af­ter his pa­ter­nal grand­fa­ther.

“I would like to grow in real es­tate and cap­ture the Soweto mar­ket.

“With con­struc­tion, I want to cap­ture the Sand­ton mar­ket. The fu­ture is quite broad.”

‘ ‘ Peo­ple were en­gaged but do­ing stuff on the side

/ PETER MOGAKI

The en­tre­pre­neur also also runs a con­struc­tion com­pany called Tl­habaki Projects.

Mot­shabi Tyelele and Ka­belo Moalusi on ‘Isidingo’

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