SAVOUR THE YEAR OF THE ROOSTER

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By Jeremy Pang Want to have a go at mak­ing your own Chi­nese dim sum? Jeremy’s recipe in­cludes a use­ful guide to mak­ing these won­der­fully crispy shi­itake and chive dumplings, with tips on how to per­fectly wrap and shape them.

Most Chi­nese dumplings can ei­ther be deep-fried, pan­fried, steamed or blanched, though there is some­thing in­cred­i­bly mor­eish about deep­fried ones with their crunchy ex­te­rior and hot, steamy fill­ing. Much like fresh pasta, when made from scratch, dumplings should not be over­cooked – whichever way you choose to cook them, the cook­ing process should not take any longer than five min­utes.

The goal is to cook the pas­try and fill­ing through, while keep­ing that al dente bite. Served with noo­dles for a great al­ter­na­tive to a Sun­day lunch.

FOR THE DUMPLING WRAP­PERS

225g of plain flour 130ml of hot wa­ter, plus ex­tra

if re­quired veg­etable oil, for fry­ing

FOR THE FILL­ING

Makes 25 50g of rice noo­dles 1 hand­ful of co­rian­der 1 spring onion 2.5cm piece gin­ger 1 gar­lic clove 5 shi­itake mush­rooms,

soaked and drained 200g of chives, Chi­nese chives

prefer­ably or gar­lic shoots By Paul Ainsworth Duck coated in a range of piquant flavours is served up with a cool­ing cu­cum­ber and as­para­gus salad.

FOR THE ARO­MATIC DUCK

1 duck crown, 900g 1 onion, peeled and quar­tered 2 red chillies, halved 85g of root gin­ger, peeled,

roughly chopped 1 gar­lic clove, halved 2 cin­na­mon sticks 3 star anise 1 large or­ange, halved 2 2/3 hand­fuls of co­rian­der,

stalks only 250ml of port 4 tbsp of Hoi Sin sauce 2 tbsp of soy sauce 2 tbsp of clear honey 2l chicken stock 2 cel­ery sticks, halved 1 pak choi, 5 leaves only 1 head of Chi­nese leaf, 1

leaf only

FOR THE MARI­NADE

1 tbs of light soy sauce ¼ tsp black pep­per ¼ tsp gran­u­lated su­gar 2 tsp sesame oil ½ tbs of corn­flour

FOR THE DIP­PING SAUCE

4 tbs of light soy sauce 4 tbs of black rice vine­gar 2.5cm piece gin­ger, finely

sliced

PAS­TRY:

Sieve the flour into a bowl. Grad­u­ally add the wa­ter, mix­ing with a fork to form a dough, then knead it on a lightly dusted sur­face for five min­utes un­til slightly elas­tic.

Roll out the pas­try to a thick­ness of 1-2mm, then use a 70mm di­am­e­ter cir­cu­lar cut­ter to cut out as many pas­tries as pos­si­ble.

Set the pas­tries aside on a bak­ing sheet or tray and cover with a tea towel un­til needed.

Put the noo­dles in a bowl, cover with hot wa­ter and soak for 3 min­utes. Drain and dry the noo­dles on a kitchen towel, then finely chop them along with all the other fill­ing in­gre­di­ents.

Put the chopped fill­ing in­gre­di­ents into a bowl along with the mari­nade in­gre­di­ents and mix to­gether well.

Com­bine the dip­ping sauce in­gre­di­ents

FILL­ING: MARI­NADE: DIP­PING:

1 leek, halved 2 car­rots, quar­tered

AS­PARA­GUS AND CU­CUM­BER SALAD

in a small bowl or ramekin and wrap the dumplings. Place one tea­spoon of the fill­ing in the cen­tre of each cir­cle of dough. Fold the bot­tom cen­tre over the fill­ing to form a semi­cir­cle and pinch the top tight.

Pinch the two cor­ners of the semi­cir­cle to­gether leav­ing two sym­met­ri­cal Mickey Mouse ear shapes be­tween your cen­tre fold and the cor­ner folds.

Now pinch the ears in to­wards you to make four lay­ered folds.

Tidy up to cre­ate a half­moon shape and ar­range on a plate.

Half-fill a large pot, wok or deep-fryer with veg­etable oil and heat to 180°C or un­til the tip of a wooden chop­stick or skewer starts to fizz af­ter a sec­ond or so in the oil.

Care­fully add the dumplings in batches of no more than 10 and deep-fry for 3 min­utes, un­til golden brown.

Re­move the dumplings care­fully with a slot­ted spoon and drain well on a plate cov­ered with kitchen pa­per.

Serve im­me­di­ately with the dip­ping sauce.

Recipe from Chi­nese Un­chopped by Jeremy Pang (R376, Pho­tog­ra­phy by Martin Poole 6 as­para­gus, stems re­moved,

halved length­ways 1 cu­cum­ber 3 spring onions, sliced length­ways 4 French break­fast radishes, sliced

length­ways 1 tsp chives, chopped 1 tbsp of chervil, chopped 1 dash of le­mon juice salt ground black pep­per olive oil

DUCK:

Place the onion, cel­ery, leek, car­rots, chillies, gin­ger and gar­lic into a large bowl. Rub the duck all over with a lit­tle salt and place on top of the veg­eta­bles.

Cover with cling film and leave to mar­i­nate for 15-30 min­utes, or, for best re­sults – leave overnight in the fridge. Pre­heat the oven to 230°C. Heat a large fry­ing pan un­til hot and add the duck breast, skin-side down. Fry for 4 or 5 min­utes, turn­ing the breast fre­quently un­til browned all over.

Re­move the duck from the pan and set aside to rest on a cool­ing rack. Re­move some fat from the fry­ing pan, leav­ing

t the ta­ble to carve. Best served with tra­di­tional Chi­nese pan­cakes or steamed rice. By Sally Abé Spring rolls are tra­di­tion­ally eaten dur­ing the spring fes­ti­val in China, hence the name. Be­lieved to bring wealth and pros­per­ity in the new year (be­cause the roll is the shape and colour of a gold bar) spring rolls are a tasty, easy snack to pre­pare for Chi­nese New Year or as part of a buf­fet at a party. Spring roll pas­try can be a lit­tle tricky to get hold of, but Asian su­per­mar­kets will def­i­nitely sell it. Spring rolls spring roll sheets, 1 packet 1/2 Chi­nese cab­bage, cut into

fine chif­fon­ade 1 hand­ful of bean sprouts 1/2 large car­rot, cut into

match­sticks 50g of rice noo­dles, ver­mi­celli,

bro­ken into small pieces 2 gar­lic cloves, minced gin­ger, 2cm piece, minced 1 tbsp of co­rian­der 1 tbsp of sesame oil 1 tbsp of rice wine, prefer­ably

shaox­ing 1 tbsp of soy sauce 3 tsp corn­flour, mixed with 3

ta­ble­spoons of wa­ter 1 tbsp of sesame oil salt oil, for fry­ing To be­gin, soak the noo­dles in warm wa­ter for 8–10 min­utes.

Heat a wok over a high heat with the sesame oil and add the cab­bage, car­rots and bean sprouts and cook for a minute, stir­ring all the time.

Add the gar­lic and gin­ger and cook for a few more min­utes, or un­til soft­ened, then stir in the soy sauce, shaox­ing wine, spring onions and co­rian­der.

Trans­fer to a bowl to cool slightly and drain off any ex­cess mois­ture.

To make the spring rolls, lay a layer of spring roll pas­try on a clean work sur­face with a cor­ner fac­ing to­ward you

Place a ta­ble­spoon of the veg­etable mix­ture on the cor­ner of the pas­try and be­gin to di­ag­o­nally roll the pas­try up tightly around the fill­ing.

When you get to the mid­dle of the pas­try, fold in the cor­ners from ei­ther side and brush a lit­tle of the corn­flour mix­ture on to the re­main­ing cor­ner, fin­ish rolling up and press to­gether to seal.

Re­peat with the rest of the mix­ture and pas­try.

Fill a deep saucepan with oil and heat to 180°C.

Deep-fry the spring rolls in batches for 2–3 min­utes, un­til golden brown and crispy.

Serve im­me­di­ately.

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