Our labour laws need a fun­da­men­tal work­ing over

The Star Early Edition - - OPINION & ANALYSIS - MICHAEL BAGRAIM, MP, DA DEPUTY SHADOW MIN­IS­TER OF LABOUR

YOUR ar­ti­cle in the edi­tion of Busi­ness Re­port of June 2, “Un­em­ploy­ment rate high­est since 2003”, refers.

Ob­vi­ously this speaks very loudly about the fail­ure of our cur­rent gov­ern­ment. We can­not even see the light at the end of the tun­nel.

In fact it has been ven­tured by most of the econ­o­mists that we can ex­pect more of the same.

Clearly, our Min­is­ter of Labour has a lot to an­swer for, but it would be un­fair to blame her en­tirely.

The rest of the min­istries have cre­ated a sit­u­a­tion in South Africa to­day where it is al­most im­pos­si­ble to turn the sit­u­a­tion around.

What one needs is a com­plete re­jig of our em­ploy­ment reg­u­la­tions and a care­ful look at our econ­omy.

I ven­ture to state that our cur­rent gov­ern­ment, which is bogged down by Cosatu, will never be able to in­tro­duce the nec­es­sary mea­sures that are nec­es­sary to cre­ate new jobs.

The nine-and-a-half mil­lion peo­ple that are un­em­ployed and those who will be look­ing for jobs in the near fu­ture need to un­der­stand that their only hope is for a com­plete and ut­ter change to the sys­tem.

Un­for­tu­nately, peo­ple need to suf­fer the con­se­quences of our neg­a­tive labour leg­is­la­tion and reg­u­la­tions un­til 2019.

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