SEA­SIDE FRESH WITH A FLOUR­ISH

Mar­garet Hirsch, the ma­tri­arch of the mul­ti­mil­lion­rand fam­ily-run ap­pli­ance and fur­ni­ture store, Hirsch’s, is a decor doyenne. She chat­ted to Omesh­nie Naidoo about in­te­grated spa­ces

The Star Late Edition - - FRONT PAGE -

ABEAUTIFUL kitchen is to a home what di­a­mond stud ear­rings are to a girl’s jew­ellery trousseau – I would ar­gue, in­dis­pens­able and in­dica­tive.

The host­ess with the mostest wears them both with pride.

And while beauty is in the eye of the be­holder, there are al­ways pre­vail­ing trends. When it comes to kitchens, stream­lined and min­i­mal­ist are de rigueur.

“Even in small places, we can achieve spa­cious kitchens,” says Hirsch.

“If you’re get­ting a new kitchen, con­sider the Scan­di­na­vian style, which con­tin­ues to be rel­e­vant. Think beau­ti­ful white Neiman doors, no han­dles, no fuss, with in­te­grated ap­pli­ances – the fridge and its friends all be­hind doors.

“Fo­cus on clever light­ing, be­neath and above the cup­boards, as well as mir­rored sur­faces, such as re­flec­tive mo­saic, to am­plify the il­lu­sion of space.

“We’re lov­ing Cae­sar­stone and the uni­for­mity it of­fers. You can cre­ate a grand penin­sula in the ma­te­rial in your kitchen and carry it through to other spa­ces in the home such as bath­room van­ity, stair­case and walk-in closet.”

In­te­rior de­signer Grant Ho­rak, of Ho­rak Venter De­sign, who works closely with Hirsch on her nu­mer­ous projects, says con­ti­nu­ity is def­i­nitely key.

“Mod­ern-day liv­ing is in­te­grated on var­i­ous lev­els. To cre­ate har­mony, choose only a few qual­ity ma­te­ri­als for the home and re­peat them. Use the same floor­ing through­out your home. If you like a par­tic­u­lar artist – such as the Sandy Slater pieces we’ve show­cased here – dis­play them.”

Lynda Kap­si­malis, who Hirsch asked to do the ta­ble, used this prin­ci­ple, re­peat­ing cab­bage leaves and penny gum, white roses and snow­don on a long, ca­sual din­ing ta­ble. Vases for height hold white roses and pea­cock feather.

“The turquoise chairs of­fer a dis­tinct start­ing point. We used crockery that matched on a crisp, white table­cloth and off­set ev­ery­thing with gold can­dles and gold faux-leather place mats.”

Ho­rak says open-plan, in­te­grated liv­ing spa­ces do not have to be bland and bor­ing.

“We’ve gone for dra­matic crys­tal chan­de­liers, Ver­sa­cein­spired thick pile rugs and mir­rors. The trick is that we used them more than once.

“We haven’t shied away from colour, ei­ther. The ocean view in this house in­spired a la­goon theme and we’ve em­braced and lay­ered turquoise. The piece de re­sis­tance is a sil­ver-leaf paint tech­nique wall in the foyer and liv­ing room.

“The dark seafoam-like colour seems to trick the eye into be­liev­ing there is more space,” he says.

“The guest bed­room is a con­trast. We’ve opted for saf­fron stripes on the wall and Jim Thomp­son fabric on the bed.”

Tex­ture is an­other key el­e­ment, says Hirsch. “Choose decor items with in­ter­est. We’ve added a faux St­ingray-top ta­ble, a moth­erof-pearl side ta­ble, glass-blown lamp­shade stand and hand-painted drinks cab­i­net. The wall­pa­per in the TV lounge is Ver­sace leop­ard skin with crys­tal dust.”

Hirsch ad­vises that what­ever you buy for your home, you seek out qual­ity and re­li­a­bil­ity.

“Decor is about more than pretty scat­ters; you want it to look good but you also want it to func­tion for you.

“There’s no rea­son the prac­ti­cal pieces can’t be aes­thet­i­cally pleas­ing or in­te­grated into your space to cre­ate the feel­ing a home should have.”

The ocean view in this house in­spired a la­goon theme with dra­matic crys­tal chan­de­lier. The dark seafoam-like colour seems to trick the eye into be­liev­ing there is more space.

The open-plan in­te­grated liv­ing spa­ces with Ver­sace-in­spired thick pile rugs.

The guest bed­room has saf­fron stripes on the wall and Jim Thomp­son fabric on the bed.

Cab­bage leaves and penny gum, white roses and snow­don on a long ca­sual din­ing ta­ble. Vases for height use white roses and pea­cock feather.

The turquoise chairs of­fer a dis­tinct start­ing point.

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