Make magic with mo­saics

Add zest to your gar­den with unique works of art cre­ated by your­self

Weekend Argus (Saturday Edition) - - GOOD GARDENING - KAY MONT­GOMERY

LATE win­ter can be a cold, wet time in the West­ern Cape. We have to re­think our ap­proach to colour in new-style wa­ter smart gar­dens, where bor­ders are no longer filled with the masses of wa­ter-con­sum­ing an­nu­als and bulbs that have al­ways been the providers of sea­sonal colour.

“South African land­scap­ers are find­ing in­no­va­tive ways to brighten up low-wa­ter us­age gar­dens by in­clud­ing mo­saic work in their gar­den de­signs,” says land­scape ex­pert Bev­er­ley Bal­lard-Tre­meer.

“The use of mo­saics is a clever way to add per­ma­nent colour to a gar­den. It works par­tic­u­larly well with low-main­te­nance gar­dens, where one sim­ply does not want to spend a lot of time pam­per­ing plants to en­cour­age pro­lific bloom­ing.”

As mod­ern ur­ban gar­dens are typ­i­cally sur­rounded by walls, it makes sense to use the walls as a back­drop for dis­plays of mo­saic work. This also helps to break up a bare ex­panse of wall that can oth­er­wise be rather dom­i­nat­ing.

Paint­ing walls in deep tones of grey can help them re­cede into the back­ground, leav­ing the mo­saics to stand out clearly.

Other pos­si­bil­i­ties are us­ing daz­zling mo­saic along the edges of a con­structed wa­ter fea­ture, to adorn con­tain­ers, or on a sim­ple geo­met­ric shape that can serve as a fo­cal point in the gar­den.

Choose colours for a mo­saic fea­ture bear­ing in mind the over­all de­sign style and colour scheme of your gar­den.

While any bright colour will look good in a gar­den com­posed mainly of green­ery, or a trop­i­cal gar­den with bril­liant blooms, par­tic­u­lar shades may suit cer­tain gar­den styles more than oth­ers.

For ex­am­ple, the “hot” colours of red, or­ange and deep yel­low work well with an in­dige­nous gar­den whereas ma­genta pink and pur­ple would com­ple­ment a Moroc­canin­spired de­sign.

Bright blue works well with most Mediter­ranean gar­dens, while a mo­saic made of mir­ror tiles is per­fect for con­tem­po­rary de­sign.

Mo­saic is avail­able in easy-toap­ply sheets, mak­ing a sim­ple edg­ing of mo­saic or cov­er­ing a cube­shaped con­tainer an easy task.

Putting a multi-colour de­sign on a wall or con­tainer is more com­plex.

A sketch must be made on the wall, or a re­pro­duc­tion of a pic­ture at­tached to the wall, with a clear guide to the colours needed.

Then in­di­vid­ual mo­saic pieces are at­tached to the wall with ad­he­sive. Lastly, grout­ing is ap­plied.

PIC­TURE: KAY MONT­GOMERY

SPELL­BIND­ING: A sim­ple geo­met­ric shape or­na­mented with bright mo­saics en­hances a gar­den at any time of the year.

PIC­TURE: KAY MONT­GOMERY

BRIGHT AND CHEER­FUL. Colour­ful mo­saics demon­strate how gar­den art en­hances a wa­ter fea­ture pa­tio dec­o­rated in or­ange, red and gold.

PIC­TURE: LUKAS OTTO

BRIGHT BALL: Ma­genta and cobalt blue mo­saic work add vi­brant colour to a wa­ter-wise Moroc­can gar­den.

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