HOW PRE­DIC­TION ALL ADDS UP

THE END IS NIGH?

Weekend Witness - - News -

WHEN the cred­u­lous stop won­der­ing what hap­pened to to­day’s Judg­ment Day, the rest of the world will still be won­der­ing where the no­tion came from that the right­eous — which to­tals three per­cent of hu­man­ity — will be ush­ered into the hereafter, while ev­ery­one else will be pum­melled by tsunamis and all sorts of nat­u­ral dis­as­ters for five months.

And then, on Oc­to­ber 21, God would have de­stroyed any­thing and any­one that’s left.

The orig­i­na­tor of this God delu­sion is Harold Camp­ing, head of Fam­ily Ra­dio broad­cast­ing net­work, which has 150 sta­tions in the United States.

Camp­ing claimed on his web­site that he had “in­fal­li­ble, ab­so­lute proof” of the end. Camp­ing says that be­cause Je­sus was cru­ci­fied on Fri­day, April 1, 33 AD, and that it takes ex­actly 365,2422 days for the Earth to com­plete one or­bit of the Sun, we can con­clude that, on April 1, 2011, Je­sus was cru­ci­fied ex­actly 722 449,07 days ago. Add 51 days to this to get to May 1, and you get a fig­ure of 722 500,07.

Round that down to the near­est in­te­ger, and you get 722 500, which is an im­por­tant num­ber be­cause it is the square of 5 x 17 x 10. The num­ber five, says Camp­ing, rep­re­sents atone­ment. Ten rep­re­sents com­plete­ness, and 17 rep­re­sents heaven. Mul­ti­ply all these to­gether — twice — and you get 722 500. There­fore the apoca­lypse kicks off on Satur­day, May 21.

Scep­tics might ask why the date of the end of the world is linked to that of Je­sus’ cru­ci­fix­ion, why the num­bers five, 10, and 17 rep­re­sent what Camp­ing claims they rep­re­sent, why they should be mul­ti­plied to­gether, why they should then be squared, and, for that mat­ter, why the Bi­ble would con­tain es­o­teric nu­mero­log­i­cal ref­er­ences pre­dict­ing the end of the world in the first place.

They could also point out that April 1, 33 AD was ac­tu­ally a Wed­nes­day, and that, un­der Camp­ing’s method, April 1, 2011 gets counted twice. — Sup­plied.

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