Eas­ier To Swal­low

From li­bido lifters to al­lergy al­le­vi­a­tors, there’s a sup­ple­ment for every­thing. But do you know your ABC when it comes to vi­ta­mins A, B and C? Take our quiz to find out if your knowl­edge needs a boost

Women's Health (South Africa) - - CONTENTS -

How au fait are you with sup­ple­ments re­ally?

A. Chamomile B. Fev­er­few C. Ginger

1 IF YOU CAN’T ES­CAPE DOMS, WHICH SUPP SHOULD YOU POP?

C. A daily dose of ginger can re­duce pos­tex­er­cise mus­cle pain by 25 per­cent, found the Univer­sity of Ge­or­gia in the US. As well as the abil­ity to re­lieve stom­ach up­set, nau­sea and morn­ing sick­ness, ginger con­tains com­pounds shown to curb in­flam­ma­tion, re­duce ox­ida­tive stress and mod­u­late other heal­ing mech­a­nisms within the body. Let your foam roller know you’ll be spend­ing less time to­gether.

2 YOU’RE AL­READY DOWN­ING LIQUID COL­LA­GEN, BUT WHAT ELSE CAN TACKLE AN­TI­AGE­ING FROM THE IN­SIDE?

A. ALA B. AHT C. ABC

A. Al­pha lipoic acid, to give it its full name, is an an­tiox­i­dant that works to slow down age­ing, safe­guard­ing against vi­sion-im­pair­ing cataracts and neu­rode­gen­er­a­tive dis­or­ders like Alzheimer’s. It also low­ers blood-sugar lev­els, which aids weight loss, found The Amer­i­can Jour­nal of Medicine. Get it in Clicks Es­sen­tials Al­pha Lipoic Acid (R109).

3 A MUL­TI­VI­TA­MIN WILL COM­PEN­SATE FOR THAT MCDON­ALD’S BINGE.

A. True B. False

B. Err, ’fraid not. Just as you can’t out-train a bad diet, you can’t out­sup­ple­ment it ei­ther. Vi­ta­min pills (alone) prob­a­bly aren’t enough to im­prove over­all health. But a re­view in Nu­tri­tion Jour­nal did find that peo­ple who use them tend to seek out well­ness and live health­ier lifestyles by eat­ing a bal­anced diet, ex­er­cis­ing reg­u­larly and avoid­ing smok­ing.

4 COBALAMIN IS ESSEN­TIAL FOR YOUR BODY TO TICK LIKE CLOCK­WORK. BY WHAT NAME IS IT BET­TER KNOWN? A. Caf­feine B. Vi­ta­min B12 C. Zinc

B. This won­der vi­ta­min sus­tains your phys­i­cal, emo­tional and mental en­ergy. And Nu­tri­tion Re­search says it’s cru­cial in old age for guard­ing against de­men­tia and re­duc­ing stroke risk. Not get­ting enough? Get a supp. Try SO­LAL Su­per Mega B Com­plex (R275) from Faith­ful-ToNa­ture.co.za.

5 YOU CAN’T HAVE TOO MUCH BETA-CAROTENE.

A. True B. False

B. It’s the nu­tri­ent that makes car­rots or­ange and it’s a pow­er­ful an­tiox­i­dant, but the Univer­sity of Colorado has found that over­sup­ple­men­ta­tion in­creases your risk of lung can­cer and heart dis­ease by 20 per­cent. The gov­ern­ment rec­om­mends tak­ing no more than 7mg per day. Bet­ter still, glean it from nat­u­ral sources, like car­rots, sweet pota­toes and kale.

6 WHICH OF TH­ESE CAN BOOST EN­ERGY?

A. Cop­per B. Mag­ne­sium C. Chromium

B. If your lev­els are low, you’ll use more oxy­gen when ac­tive, mean­ing your body has to work harder and you’ll tire sooner, says the Jour­nal of Nu­tri­tion. Aim for 270mg per day. Boost your in­take with B-CAL-DM (R170).

7 TOO MUCH VI­TA­MIN D CAN BE TOXIC.

A. True B. False

B. Our main source of vi­ta­min D is sun­light, but iron­i­cally, tons of us are still de­fi­cient. The good news, ac­cord­ing to re­searchers at the Mayo Clinic, is that tox­i­c­ity from too much vi­ta­min D sup­ple­men­ta­tion is ex­tremely rare. To keep your bones and teeth healthy, con­sider tak­ing 25mg a day through­out the win­ter months.

8 WHAT SHOULD YOU REACH FOR IF YOU’RE SUFFERING FROM AL­LER­GIES?

A. Pro­bi­otics B. Vi­ta­min C C. Gin­seng

A. Get pop­ping the pro­bi­otics pre-sneezy sea­son; they’ve been proven to help al­le­vi­ate hay fever by Van­der­bilt Univer­sity in the US and they may help re­lieve symp­toms of other al­ler­gies too. Look for lac­to­bacil­lus aci­dophilus when sup­ple­ment­ing.

9 CAL­CIUM SUP­PLE­MENTS UP BONE STRENGTH BY:

A. Two per­cent B. 20 per­cent C. 200 per­cent

A. While cal­cium is needed for strong bones, a daily pill will only strengthen them by two per­cent, says the BMJ. And too much can up your risk of heart dis­ease. Stick to milk, broc­coli, tofu and sar­dines.

WHICH OF TH­ESE NU­TRI­ENTS CAN HELP IF YOUR LI­BIDO IS LOW?

A. Flu­o­ride B. Se­le­nium C. Iron

C. If you’re feel­ing as sexy as a toi­let brush, then up your iron in­take. A re­cent study in The Jour­nal of Sex­ual Medicine says that not get­ting enough can make you feel anx­ious and tired – both key is­sues in fe­male sex­ual dys­func­tion. Try Fer­rous Forte tablets (R162).

11 NAT­U­RAL REME­DIES DON’T COME WITH ANY HEALTH RISKS.

A. True B. False

B. Nat­u­ral doesn’t al­ways mean safe. Many herbal sup­ple­ments can in­ter­fere with other med­i­ca­tion, such as St John’s wort, which may help lift a low mood, but can also re­duce the ef­fec­tive­ness of the con­tra­cep­tive pill. Al­ways con­sult your GP first.

12 WHICH WORK TRAU­MAS COULD VI­TA­MIN B HELP PRE­VENT?

A. Go­ing all Chris­tian Bale on the mild-man­nered IT man. B. Weep­ing silently in the toi­lets. C. Pulling out your eye­lashes as you wait for the printer to work.

All three are signs of work-re­lated stress: if you’re feel­ing the strain of your 9 to 5, you may be lack­ing in B vi­ta­mins. Af­ter 90 days of sup­ple­ments, sub­jects in a study by Aus­tralia’s Swin­burne Univer­sity re­ported a 20 per­cent de­crease in jo­bre­lated stress. Or re­sign. That works wonders too.

13 TAK­ING VI­TA­MIN D THROUGH­OUT A TOUGH TRAIN­ING REGIME WILL HELP PRE­VENT...

A. Your bones from break­ing. B. Your mus­cles from aching. C. Your bow­els from evac­u­at­ing.

A. Vi­ta­min D has – as far as we’re aware – no lim­it­ing ef­fect on your toi­let habits, but ac­cord­ing to the Jour­nal of Foot & An­kle Surgery, by up­ping your bone den­sity it can re­duce the risk of stress frac­tures when you do high-im­pact ex­er­cise.

14 WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO WASH DOWN A VI­TA­MIN C PILL?

A. Green juice B. Green tea C. Black tea B. Vi­ta­min C helps your body squeeze out green tea’s an­tiox­i­dants, found Pur­due Univer­sity in the US, while cof­fee blocks the ab­sorp­tion of key nu­tri­ents.

15 VI­TA­MIN B AND FOLIC ACID ARE GOOD FOR BRAIN HEALTH.

A. True B. False

B. Th­ese supps have long been thought to pro­tect against me­mory loss in old age. But a re­cent study in the jour­nal Neu­rol­ogy found that two years of sup­ple­men­ta­tion (on top of your rec­om­mended daily re­quire­ment) had no pos­i­tive ef­fect on cog­ni­tive func­tion.

16 TAK­ING VI­TA­MIN CAN RE­DUCE CHANCES OF CATCH­ING A COLD BY…

A. 3 per­cent B. 30 per­cent C. 300 per­cent

A. Cochrane Li­brary an­a­lysed 72 stud­ies and found that a vi­ta­min C supp a day does lit­tle to keep the snif­fles away and it only re­duces a cold’s du­ra­tion by eight per­cent. Spend your money on vi­ta­min C-rich oranges in­stead.

17 VI­TA­MIN B12 CAN HELP WITH YOUR ACNE FLARE-UP.

A. True B. False

B. Step away from this vit if you’re prone to pim­ply skin. A study in Science Trans­la­tional Medicine found that it tweaks how genes be­have in fa­cial bac­te­ria, prompt­ing the bac­te­ria com­monly linked to acne to start pump­ing out in­flam­ma­tory mol­e­cules that can trig­ger a break­out.

18 IF YOU’D LIKE TO GO A LIT­TLE LANCE ARM­STRONG WITH­OUT AC­TU­ALLY DO­ING ANY­THING IL­LE­GAL, TRY...

A. Dan­de­lion-root ex­tract B. De­caf­feinated green tea ex­tract C. Grape­seed ex­tract

B. A study by Anglia Ruskin Univer­sity and the Univer­sity of Hert­ford­shire in the UK found that cy­clists went 10.9 per­cent fur­ther over one hour af­ter four weeks of tak­ing de­caf­feinated green tea ex­tract. Why? Their bodies burned more fat as fuel, pre­serv­ing their glyco­gen re­serves for a bet­ter per­for­mance.

CRAN­BERRY JUICE CAP­SULES CAN LOWER YOUR RISK OF URI­NARY TRACT IN­FEC­TION BY HOW MUCH?

A. 10 per­cent B. 15 per­cent C. 20 per­cent

C. It’s es­ti­mated that nearly two-thirds of women will suf­fer with a UTI, so it’s worth tak­ing pre­cau­tion­ary mea­sures. A BMJ study found that once you have an at­tack, how­ever, cran­berry juice can’t help. It’s just like your mum al­ways said: pre­ven­tion is bet­ter than cure.

A VI­TA­MIN D DE­FI­CIENCY HAS BEEN LINKED TO...

A. IBS B. In­fer­til­ity C. Eczema

A & B. Your body turns vi­ta­min D into a hor­mone needed to pro­duce high­qual­ity eggs, ac­cord­ing to a study pub­lished by the En­docrine So­ci­ety, while the Univer­sity of Sh­effield found that 82 per­cent of IBS suf­fer­ers they tested were vi­ta­min D de­fi­cient. Try­ing to con­ceive? Go for 50mg per day. For IBS re­lief, try 75mg.

AN OMEGA-3 SUP­PLE­MENT WILL HELP YOU GET MORE...

A. Hot sex. B. Good friends. C. Sound sleep.

C. Af­ter four months of sup­ple­men­ta­tion, chil­dren in a Univer­sity of Ox­ford study slept for longer with fewer dis­tur­bances. The lead pro­fes­sor thinks the re­sults would be the same for adults, so swal­low a cap­sule daily and sleep like a baby.

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