YOUR ONE-STOP GUIDE TO MO­TOR­ING

From how to con­test a traf­fic fine, to game drive eti­quette, it’s all here!

WOW (Women on Wheels) - - CONTENTS - BY CAIRA-LEE DURAND

Fines and sum­monses: how to con­test them

What are your rights when it comes to traf­fic fines and sum­monses? Firstly, there are two types of traf­fic fines: a Sec­tion 56 no­tice (which is given to you by a traf­fic of­fi­cer) and a 341 traf­fic ticket (vi­o­la­tion caught on cam­era or when a mo­torist isn’t present to be is­sued the ticket – i.e. the pink ticket you get when you park on a red line). There are ways to con­test your traf­fic fine and you have the right to do so. This can be done in per­son or in writ­ing.

IN WRIT­ING Send a let­ter to your lo­cal traf­fic depart­ment, ex­plain­ing your rea­son for the of­fense. Your let­ter can be sent via post or by fax.

IN PER­SON Ac­cord­ing to the City of Cape Town, the other op­tion is for you to con­tact the Pub­lic Pros­e­cu­tor di­rectly at the court that ap­pears on your fine. If you have re­ceived a sum­mons, do so be­fore the date you are due to ap­pear in court.

WHAT TO DO AT A ROAD­BLOCK

No-one likes to be pulled over at a road­block, but it’s worth know­ing your rights when it hap­pens. The Au­to­mo­bile As­so­ci­a­tion (AA) notes the fol­low­ing im­por­tant facts for women to know about road­blocks.

DID YOU KNOW?

›› You’re en­ti­tled to ask a po­lice of­fi­cer, whether in uni­form or not, to prove their iden­tity. If an of­fi­cer can­not pro­vide an ap­point­ment of cer­tifi­cate on de­mand, he or she is in vi­o­la­tion of the Crim­i­nal Pro­ce­dure Act.

›› By law, you should al­ways keep your driv­ing li­cence on you when you are driv­ing and an of­fi­cer has the right to in­spect it.

›› A male of­fi­cer may not phys­i­cally search a fe­male, and vice versa.

›› An of­fi­cer may not ar­rest or de­tain you for an out­stand­ing fine for which there is no war­rant of ar­rest.

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