THE NEW­BORN AD­VICE YOU SHOULD IG­NORE

When it comes to car­ing for your baby, old wives’s’ tales abound – many of which you shouldn’t takeke too se­ri­ously (and with very good rea­son)

Your Baby & Toddler - - FRONT PAGE - BY SR BURGIERGIE IRE­LAND

Although par­ent­ing ba­sics stay the same from one gen­er­a­tion to the next, trends come and go – es­pe­cially when re­search proves a prac­tice to be un­nec­es­sary, un­help­ful or even harm­ful. As a new par­ent, you’re go­ing to be over­whelmed with ad­vice and tips from your fam­ily, friends and com­plete strangers, and there’s also West­ern ver­sus tra­di­tional or al­ter­na­tive medicine in com­pe­ti­tion. It’s nor­mal to feel obliged as a new mom to fol­low the in­struc­tions from your grand­mother or mother-in-law (or even herbal­ist) for the sake of fam­ily peace, but al­ways keep your baby’s wel­fare in mind. The pass­ing-on of par­ent­ing skills is im­por­tant be­cause our chil­dren’s fu­ture health andnd even hap­pi­ness de­pends on it. There is al­ways wis­dom to be gained from the momsms who came be­fore us, but each new gen­er­a­tion ner­a­tion should learn from past mis­takeskes too. For ex­am­ple, leav­ing small ba­biess to cry (in­stead of pick­ing them up) can nur­ture life­long in­se­cu­ri­ties, and us­ing a cas­tor oil stick as a sup­pos­i­tory can dam­agea­m­age a new­born’s rec­tal mus­cle for life.

So, be­fore fol­low­ing any ad­vice ice you re­ceive from well-mean­ing peo­ple, e, speak to your clinic sis­ter or doc­tor. It’s al­ways best to make sure that your baby won’t be harmed. There also a few com­mon n myths that you’ll be bet­ter off ig­nor­ing, such uch as:

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