Ba­bies

DON’T JUST BREAK

Your Baby & Toddler - - Front Page -

HOW DO I KNOW IF MY CHILD GETS ENOUGH MILK? It’s one of the big­gest fears new par­ents face, Sr Jenny says, es­pe­cially moms who breast­feed. Here are a few guide­lines: ● If your baby suck­les strongly for at least five to ten min­utes and keeps drinking there­after for a while, and feeds at least six to eight times per day, he’s prob­a­bly get­ting enough milk. ● Sr Jenny says it’s im­por­tant to take baby to the clinic to be weighed for the first few weeks of his life. You’ll quickly see if he’s not get­ting enough milk. ● Your baby should reach his birth weight again two weeks af­ter birth. ● Your baby should have at least five to seven wet nap­pies per day. ● If you breast­feed, your breasts will feel softer once your child has had a sub­stan­tial amount to drink. ● If your baby of­ten brings up a big amount of milk, is list­less, only has one or two wet nap­pies a day, has dark urine and looks pale, con­sult your pae­di­a­tri­cian im­me­di­ately.

Avoid hot wa­ter bot­tles or an elec­tric blan­ket in your baby’s cot – you can put a hot wa­ter bot­tle in his bed to warm it up be­fore bed­time, but re­move it once you’ve put him down. Don’t smoke in the house or car. Sis­ter Jenny says it’s bet­ter to have a new­born in a bassinet or cot next to your bed than in your own bed.

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