WHAT IS ECLAMP­SIA?

Your Pregnancy - - Month By Month -

Preeclamp­sia is some­times called “tox­aemia of preg­nancy” when the body swells with re­tained fluid, blood pres­sure goes up and pro­tein is found in the urine. It can be­gin at 20 weeks (about five months) of the preg­nancy and may last un­til the first week af­ter the birth and is un­for­tu­nately very com­mon in South Africa. Eclamp­sia (for­tu­nately rare) is more se­vere and can cause con­vul­sions and coma. De­liv­er­ing the baby, de­spite pre­ma­tu­rity, as quickly as pos­si­ble is the only way to re­solve eclamp­sia. En­sure your preg­nancy is con­stantly mon­i­tored if you suf­fer from hy­per­ten­sion.

TOO LOW

A low blood pres­sure in preg­nancy can be mild or se­vere. Mild hy­poten­sion low­ers the risk of hav­ing a stroke or heart at­tack, but dur­ing preg­nancy this can make a woman feel tired, weak, faint or dizzy – es­pe­cially when she stands up quickly. Low BP can be re­lieved by ly­ing on your side, as this im­proves blood flow and oxy­gen to the brain.

OTHER SYMP­TOMS OF LOW BLOOD PRES­SURE

Feel­ing light-headed with con­cen­tra­tion dif­fi­cul­ties. Pal­pi­ta­tions (rapid heart­beat). Blurred vi­sion. Feel­ing cold and clammy. Thirst.

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