Tai­wan needs strength for AIIB: Gou

Hon Hai’s Gou talks of Tai­wan’s need to demon­strate tech prow­ess

The China Post - - FRONT PAGE - BY STEPHANIE CHAO

Hon Hai’s ( ) Terry Gou (

), chair­man of the world’s largest man­u­fac­turer of con­sumer elec­tron­ics, said Tai­wan needs to pos­sess strengths in the fields of tech­nol­ogy, R&D and econ­omy in re­sponse to the re­cent is­sue of join­ing the China-led Asian In­fra­struc­ture In­vest­ment Bank (AIIB) yes­ter­day.

Gou vis­ited Sanxia Ai Wu Yuan, his fam­ily’s burial site, yes­ter­day to pay re­spects to his de­ceased fa­ther. In a brief in­ter­view with me­dia out­lets, car­ried by the Cen­tral News Agency, he talked about Hon Hai's abil­ity to pro­duce the most in­no­va­tive prod­ucts in­ter­na­tion­ally due to its prow­ess in elec­tron­ics, ma­chin­ery, op­tics and ma­te­ri­als.

Us­ing the ex­am­ple of Hon Hai’s joint ven­ture with Ja­panese com­pany Softbank on de­vel­op­ing Pep­per the robot, Gou said Hon Hai had achieved way be­yond sub­con­tract­ing, and in­stead had earned its acu­men through in- vest­ment in R&D of its own. The tech­nol­ogy re­quired for Pep­per to move its hand in­volves five joints, and on that alone Hon Hai in­vested two years of R&D to achieve a mov­able hand that can al­low fin­gers to clasp with­out in­ter­fer­ing with each other, Gou said.

Re­gard­ing the is­sue of join­ing the AIIB, Gou pointed that if Tai­wan had more qual­ity tech­nol­ogy com­pa­nies “other coun­tries would be ask­ing for us to join.” If Tai­wan lacks any stand­ing in tech­nol­ogy, R&D and eco­nomics, join­ing the AIIB would only be an act of giv­ing out money and help with­out get­ting benefits in re­turn, Gou said.

Gou said t hat ev­ery­one should be more ac­tive and op­ti­mistic, stat­ing that the “only en­emy is our­selves.” Hon Hai will con­tinue to in­vest in Tai­wan, Gou stated, as he felt op­ti­mistic about Tai­wan’s fu­ture due to its open­ness and inno-

va­tive tech­nol­ogy.

AIIB Talks Hot on Ex­ec­u­tive

Yuan’s Chan­nel

In the Ex­ec­u­tive Yuan’s se­ries of live broad­casts, in which Cabi­net mem­bers ex­plain and de­bate ma­jor poli­cies ( ), the dis­cus­sion led by Fi­nance Min­is­ter Chang Sheng-ford ( ) about the AIIB has be­come one of the most viewed videos since it was pub­lished, of­fi­cials said.

Chang’s talk about the AIIB was a spon­ta­neous ses­sion, said Cabi­net spokesman Sun Lih-chyun (

), ex­plain­ing that the is­sue had be­come a con­tro­versy and re­sulted in an im­promptu ses­sion held on April 1. They in­vited Chang onto the live pro­gram to ex­plain the AIIB to Cabi­net mem­bers and view­ers.

Sun said that since the AIIB is­sue was dif­fi­cult to un­der­stand and very ab­stract, they did not an­tic­i­pate it to be popular among view­ers, fur­ther point­ing out that the long­est view­ing time was 14 min­utes.

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