CHANG­ING PER­CEP­TIONS

The China Post - - GUIDE POST -

Bar­ber sees his pop-up as an ex­ten­sion of his phi­los­o­phy that chal­lenges Amer­i­cans to rad­i­cally re­think what is ac­cept­able and un­ac­cept­able to eat. "In Amer­ica we come with this blessed land­scape, this Gar­den of Eden ... with in­cred­i­ble soils, tem­per­ate cli­mate, pre­dictable rain­fall, and we pro­duce a ton of food. And be­cause of that we were never forced into the kind of ne­go­ti­a­tions that suck up waste," he said. That ex­plains the "wasted spe­cial" served up by one of Bar­ber's guest chefs, Bill Telepan of the Up­per West Side restau­rant Telepan. He fash­ioned his plate of tuna on a bed of sal­vaged radish greens, in­cor­po­rat­ing them into a pesto, slic­ing the radish into the dish and us­ing the usu­ally tossed blood line of the fish in an aioli.

Grant Baldwin and his wife, who live in Van­cou­ver, Bri­tish Columbia, filmed them­selves living on dis­carded and culled food for six months for their doc­u­men­tary "Just Eat It." They did their share of dump­ster div­ing — head­ing to un­locked bins of whole­salers for the best finds. And they came up with some trea­sures: car­tons of eggs with plenty of time left on ex­pi­ra­tion, boxes of pricey choco­late bars tossed be­cause they did not have the req­ui­site EnglishFrench la­bel­ing re­quired in Canada, and a moun­tain of pack­aged hum­mus still in con­tain­ers but per­fectly ed­i­ble. "The whole rea­son that we did the project was to prove the food was good," Baldwin said. "Every­body talks about how 40 per­cent of food is wasted, but to see it in the bins is an­other thing. Eat­ing from dump­sters is not a good life­style for any­one. It's a ter­ri­ble life­style. The point is the food shouldn't be in the bins to begin with."

Baldwin thinks rigid stan­dards for date la­bels on pack­aged foods serve to mud­dle the ed­i­bil­ity is­sue, wrongly con­vinc­ing peo­ple that per­fectly good food is no longer safe to eat. And ap­pear­ance re­mains a huge stum­bling block in the pro­cess­ing and pack­ag­ing of food, with re­tail­ers de­mand­ing ex­act­ing uni­form stan­dards that have grow­ers and mid­dle­men toss­ing 20 to 70 per­cent of ship­ments in some cases.

Michael Muzyk knows that first-hand. He's the pres­i­dent of Baldor Spe­cialty Foods, a dis­trib­u­tor and pro­ces­sor of pro­duce in the South Bronx serv­ing high-end ho­tels and restau­rants. Baldor has made strides in re­pur­pos­ing his own wasted food, us­ing nat­u­ral en­zymes to de­hy­drate byprod­ucts be­fore they hit land­fills. The com­pany is also a ma­jor con­trib­u­tor to City Har­vest, which feeds the hun­gry in New York City us­ing res­cued food. "Will there be 100 chefs to­mor­row say­ing 'I want to fol­low Dan Bar­ber's lead?' I hope so," he said.

巴伯將自己的流動計畫視為其理念的延伸,要從根本挑戰美國人的觀念,使他們重新思考什麼可吃、什麼不可吃。他說:「美國擁有不可多得的地景,宛如伊甸園般⋯有著肥沃的土壤、溫和的氣候和可預測的雨量,還能生產出大量糧食。而正因如此,我們從來沒有被迫思考廢棄食品如何再利用。」而這也說明了巴伯的其中一名客座廚師泰勒班,為何會為了上西城的泰勒班餐廳製作「剩菜特餐」的原因。他以蘿蔔蔬菜剩菜為基底,將鮪魚肉擺放上去,再將它們融進青醬,隨後以蘿蔔切片入菜,還利用通常會被仍棄的血線來製成香蒜蛋黃醬。

住在加拿大不列顛哥倫比亞省溫哥華市的鮑德溫夫婦為了紀錄片《吃吧!》,將自己以廢棄食品維生六個月的生活拍攝下來。他們嘗試垃圾箱挖寶,也就是到批發店家開放的垃圾箱中尋覓好東西。而他們也確實找到一些寶物,例如多盒還有很久才到期的雞蛋、好幾盒因未符合加拿大英法雙語標籤規定而被扔掉的昂貴巧克力,以及一大堆裝在容器中、仍可食用的鷹嘴豆泥。鮑德溫說:「我們做這個計畫的原因完全是為了證明那些食品還是好的。每個人都在談論四成的食物是如何被浪費掉,但在垃圾桶裡親眼瞧見那些食品又是另一回事。從垃圾箱找東西吃對任何人來說都不是良好的生活型態,那是種很糟糕的生活方式。不過重點是,那些食物打從一開始就不該出現在垃圾桶裡。」

鮑德溫認為包裝食品上針對日期標籤的嚴格標準,將食物可食性的問題弄得更為混亂,也向消費者傳遞了錯誤的訊息,讓人誤以為完好如初的食物過了期限在食用上就再也不安全。而食物外觀也是加工和包裝食品的巨大阻礙,因為零售商嚴格的統一標準,使種植者和中盤商在某些情況下會丟棄二成至七成的貨物。

保德特色食品公司的總裁穆茲克對這有第一手經驗,該公司位於南布隆克斯,是為高檔酒店和餐廳供應食品的經銷商及加工商。他們在重新利用廢棄食物上已取得很大的進展,採用天然酵素將副產品在被送往垃圾場前進行脫水。保德公司也是「城市豐收教會」的主要貢獻商,該教會使用搶救回來的食品為紐約市受飢餓之苦的人供餐。穆茲克說:「明天會不會有一百個廚師說『我也想跟隨以丹巴伯為首的計畫』呢?希望如此。」

Opinions

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Taiwan

© PressReader. All rights reserved.