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Doctor's Plaza Health Magazine - - Contents -

Heavy al­co­hol use al­ters brain func­tion­ing dif­fer­ently in young men and women

Date:

Septem­ber 4, 2017

Source:

Euro­pean Col­lege of Neu­ropsy­chophar­ma­col­ogy

Sum­mary:

Sci­en­tists have found that brain func­tions in young men and women are changed by longterm al­co­hol use, but that these changes are sig­nif­i­cantly dif­fer­ent in men and women. This in­di­cates not only that young peo­ple might be at in­creased risk of long-term harm from al­co­hol use, but also that the risks are prob­a­bly dif­fer­ent in men and in women, with men pos­si­bly more at risk.

Higher cof­fee con­sump­tion as­so­ci­ated with lower risk of early death

Date:

Au­gust 27, 2017

Source:

Euro­pean So­ci­ety of Car­di­ol­ogy

Sum­mary:

Higher cof­fee con­sump­tion is as­so­ci­ated with a lower risk of early death, ac­cord­ing to new re­search. The ob­ser­va­tional study in nearly 20 000 par­tic­i­pants sug­gests that cof­fee can be part of a healthy diet in healthy peo­ple.

Swings in dad’s testos­terone af­fects the fam­ily -- for bet­ter or worse -- af­ter baby ar­rives

Date:

Septem­ber 5, 2017

Source:

Univer­sity of South­ern Cal­i­for­nia

Sum­mary:

Testos­terone lev­els are a key fac­tor in a fam­ily’s health and hap­pi­ness af­ter a new­born ar­rives. Re­searchers have found that a drop can sig­nal post­par­tum de­pres­sion in dad, and a spike may be a sign of ag­gres­sion.

Post­par­tum de­pres­sion is of­ten as­so­ci­ated with moth­ers, but a new study shows that fa­thers face a higher risk of ex­pe­ri­enc­ing it them­selves if their testos­terone lev­els drop nine months af­ter their chil­dren are born.

Mo­bile phone use while preg­nant not linked to child neu­rode­vel­op­ment prob­lems, study sug­gests

Date:

Septem­ber 5, 2017

Source:

Biomed Cen­tral

Sum­mary:

Mo­bile phone use dur­ing preg­nancy is un­likely to have any ad­verse ef­fects on child neu­rode­vel­op­ment, ac­cord­ing to new re­search. These find­ings pro­vide fur­ther ev­i­dence that ex­po­sure to ra­dio fre­quency elec­tro­mag­netic fields as­so­ci­ated with ma­ter­nal use of mo­bile phones dur­ing preg­nancy is not linked to neu­rode­vel­op­ment in chil­dren.

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