FARE

JAMIE LEE CUR­TIS AND DI­REC­TOR DAVID GORDON GREEN DIS­CUSS THE LAT­EST HAL­LOWEEN RE­MAKE AND THE CHANGES IT HAS UN­DER­GONE

The Gulf Today - Panorama - - CINEMA - By Son­aiya Kel­ley

In 1978, teenage babysit­ter Lau­rie Strode sur­vived a show­down with masked se­rial killer Michael My­ers in John Car­pen­ter ’s Hal­loween, a crit­i­cally ac­claimed and com­mer­cially suc­cess­ful slasher flick that would spawn 11 films and jump­start the ca­reer of emerg­ing young ac­tress Jamie Lee Cur­tis.

Forty years later, Strode and My­ers faced off again in Uni­ver­sal’s Hal­loween re­vival. Pro­duced by Blum­house and Mi­ra­max and di­rected by veteran indie film­maker David Gordon Green, the film grossed a mas­sive $76.2 mil­lion and shat­tered sev­eral box of­fice records when it opened last week­end.

And it did so by ig­nor­ing the 10 se­quels and re­boots that were re­leased since the orig­i­nal Hal­loween, up­end­ing sev­eral of the orig­i­nal film’s clas­sic hor­ror tropes in the process.

“The rea­son why (they’ve) taken away all the other his­tory is to tell a clean story be­tween one point and an­other,” said Cur­tis, who has reprised her role for three other Hal­loween se­quels over the years. “You can’t do that if you have to touch base on ev­ery weird plot twist of 40 years.”

In the new film, Strode is both men­tally and emo­tion­ally scarred by the events of her ado­les­cence. Trau­ma­tised and con­vinced that My­ers will re­turn to fin­ish the job, Strode trans­forms her se­cluded home in the woods into a heav­ily for­ti­fied es­tate.

The lin­ger­ing trauma has made it im­pos­si­ble for her to main­tain healthy re­la­tion­ships, ex­em­pli­fied by two failed mar­riages and an es­tranged re­la­tion­ship with her daugh­ter, Karen (Judy Greer), and grand­daugh­ter, Allyson (Andi Matichak).

“A fam­ily story is the way to tell the Hal­loween story be­cause of the trauma that gets passed from one fam­ily mem­ber to the next,” said Cur­tis. “What hap­pens to some­one when you at­tack them and they sur­vive is that the rest of their life is branded by that vi­o­lence.”

The re­lata­bil­ity of the char­ac­ters and their re­la­tion­ships are what el­e­vate this film from slasher tra­di­tions, says Gordon Green.

“I’m con­vinced that what makes a hor­ror film like this stand out, as op­posed to just a su­per­nat­u­ral ca­coph­ony of grotesque­ness, is there’s emo­tional sub­stance that we can re­late to,” he told The Times by phone shortly be­fore open­ing day.

“It’s what drew me to

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