Aldershot News & Mail : 2020-09-02

8 : 8 : 8

8

8 ADVERTISIN­G FEATURE surreylive.news NEWS & MAIL WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2020 News Celebritie­s join the campaign to stop ‘dangerous’ cuts to our fire service St Nicholas’ School celebrates fantastic GCSE results again THE SCHOOL GAINED THE TOP SPOT IN HAMPSHIRE LAST YEAR to the exam boards, they then switched in the second half of the term to bridging projects that they hoped would help and support the girls as they think about the next stage in their education. Pupils and their A level choices were matched with appropriat­e teachers who could help them undertake projects and work associated with their sixth form choices. The above approach proved both enjoyable and informativ­e for the girls and, at a time of great uncertaint­y, it helped not only to keep a continued sense of normality but also to inspire them towards their future study. Had the girls simply left when lockdown started, with no work and no routine, this may have contribute­d adversely to their wellness and purposeful­ness. Fabulous GCSE results are to be treasured and celebrated but they are also just a fairly stark list of numbers which do not, and never will, define a Year 11 girl at St Nicholas’ School. The school aims to look beyond this, and in fact really celebrate the fact that some of its leavers came to the school at the tender age of two and have since made life-long friendship­s, establishe­d themselves in the wider community as sports leaders and fabulous ambassador­s, and who will embrace all of the challenges that they will undoubtedl­y face in their bright futures. ST NICHOLAS’ School is celebratin­g the fantastic grades that its Year 11 pupils were awarded in their GCSEs this year. In a strange year, in which no actual terminal exams were taken, this year’s results were based on teachers’ knowledge of the girls’ work, their abilities and aptitudes, and the most likely outcome were they to have taken the exams. Given the strength of St Nicholas’ student performanc­e at GCSE level over several years, particular­ly last year which saw the school gaining the top spot in Hampshire, it wasn’t a huge surprise to see the number of high grades the girls attained this year and the consistent­ly excellent scores across all subjects. In ‘normal’ years, Year 11 girls would have finished school and started their study leave just before their first exam and then would only have come in after that to sit their exams. This year, however, with no exams, no study leave, re-sits proposed for anyone who didn’t get the grade they wanted, and the knowledge that staff would be responsibl­e for submitting the most accurate grade for each pupil, the school decided to continue teaching the girls all the way through the term. This approach allowed St Nicholas to cover all aspects of the GCSE courses, some of which may not have been completed when the country went into lockdown. Teaching was conducted over Office365 for all lessons and concentrat­ed on consolidat­ion work. Once staff had submitted the grades By EMMA PENGELLY STAGE STAR AND QUEEN emma.pengelly@reachplc.com @EmmaPengge­lly GUITARIST URGE RETHINK AUTHOR and screenwrit­er Emma Kennedy is the latest celebrity to call for a reversal of the cuts to Surrey Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS). She joins Queen guitarist and fellow Surrey resident, Brian May, who previously voiced concerns over the proposed changes through an Instagram post as he reacted to the Chobham Common fire. The actress, presenter, and winner of Celebrity Masterchef has launched a Save our Stations petition which has already acquired more than 2,400 signatures in a matter of days. It is campaignin­g against Surrey County Council’s Making Surrey Safer Plan, which will see the number of fire engines at night cut from 30 to 23 and changes introduced to how a number of stations are crewed. Submitting the petition to Surrey County Council, Emma wrote that the county’s fire service is “under threat”. Referring to the Chobham wildfire, she wrote: “For five consecutiv­e days in August, Surrey firefighte­rs had to battle heat, dehydratio­n and exhaustion to bring wildfires on our heathland and commons under control. You and resources” leaving the county “vulnerable to fire”. He was also writing in response to the Chobham blaze which burnt less than a mile from his Surrey house and studio. Sunningdal­e Golf Course, which is where Surrey Wildlife Trust says the fire started, adjoins Brian’s property. In the post, he wrote: “I was rescuing as many precious things from my house as was practicabl­e, under threat of the whole thing going up in flames, but praying that the horror would not happen. Today my prayers were answered - the fire is under control, but the danger is not over.” He went on to praise the “amazing” Surrey firefighte­rs for containing the inferno. May continued: “I never imagined it could happen here in leafy, and normally damp, Surrey, England. We supported the fight against the immense fires in Australia, and watched sadly as fires ravaged California, but to see this happen in my own home county has been shocking and traumatic.” The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) has welcomed the celebs’ support. Emma Kennedy EmiliE Fjola Sandy might think our firefighte­rs have everything they need. They don’t.” Firefighte­rs battling the Chobham blaze have claimed their conditions were dangerous and there were not proper welfare measures in place. According to the FBU, this meant they had to work long hours with insufficie­nt numbers of personnel in high heat and without food, relief or toilet facilities. SFRS “strongly disputed” these claims saying that adequate food, drink and toilet facilities were always provided as well as sun protection. Just a week earlier, Queen legend May wrote on Instagram that Surrey had a “firefighti­ng service criminally cut back in manpower To find out more about St Nicholas’ School, visit st-nicholas.hants.sch.uk. PRINTED AND DISTRIBUTE­D BY PRESSREADE­R PressReade­r.com +1 604 278 4604 . ORIGINAL COPY . ORIGINAL COPY . ORIGINAL COPY . ORIGINAL COPY . ORIGINAL COPY ORIGINAL COPY COPYRIGHT AND PROTECTED BY APPLICABLE LAW

© PressReader. All rights reserved.