PRE­PAR­ING ROSES FOR COLDER MONTHS

How to trim them and re­move dis­eased plant mat­ter

Amateur Gardening - - Contents -

THEY may look beau­ti­ful and smell divine, but roses cer­tainly don’t of­fer up these gifts cheaply. Hav­ing nursed them through the pests and droughts of sum­mer, you now need to set them up to sur­vive the win­ter.

The first thing you need to do is cut back the stems by around a half. This can be heart­break­ing if you still have plants in bud or bloom, but it is for their own pro­tec­tion. Rose roots grow fairly shal­low, so re­mov­ing ex­ces­sive top growth pre­vents them be­ing rocked and weak­ened by win­ter storms.

You should also re­move any dead, dis­eased, cross­ing or dam­aged growth now, cre­at­ing an el­e­gant, open plant with good ven­ti­la­tion.

If you have a stan­dard rose, shaped like a lol­lipop on a stick, snip off dead and shriv­elled branches, as well as any over-ex­u­ber­ant growth as harsh winds can se­verely dam­age these del­i­cate heads, and even snap them off. This is also a good time to re­ally get to grips with rose black spot, a com­mon and dis­fig­ur­ing fun­gal dis­ease. It shows it­self with yel­low­ing marks on fo­liage that grad­u­ally turns brown and black, and the leaves even­tu­ally fall.

It is hard to get rid of, so you should cut away all af­fected plant ma­te­rial and ei­ther burn it or dis­pose of it in the house­hold rub­bish. Then care­fully scoop up all the fallen leaves around the plant, to avoid the black spot spores over­win­ter­ing in the soil. Dis­pose of these in the same way as you do the other dis­eased ma­te­rial.

As well as cut­ting back, this is peak sea­son for plant­ing bare-root roses that are widely avail­able now.

For the best re­sults, plant them in fer­tile soil that has been en­riched with well-rot­ted com­post and ma­nure.

Gather up and de­stroy all fallen leaves with black spot Re­move and get rid of black spot Cut back roses to pro­tect them from wind-rock

Drip-feed­ing a cit­rus plant - see op­po­site

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