Take a screen­shot on an An­droid phone

No mat­ter what phone you have, MICHAEL SI­MON will help you fig­ure out the eas­i­est way to snap the screen

Android Advisor - - Contents -

Ev­ery An­droid phone is dif­fer­ent, and so is tak­ing screen­shots with them. Even though An­droid 4 in­tro­duced screen­shots for all with the power-and-vol­ume-down-key combo, nail­ing it can still be tricky. That’s why some phone mak­ers have

in­tro­duced new meth­ods. We’re here to help: just find your An­droid phone on the list be­low to learn the var­i­ous ways to snap, share, and save a screen­shot.

Acer phones

• Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for

a cou­ple of se­conds. • Pull down the no­ti­fi­ca­tion panel to reach quick

set­tings and tap the Screen­shot icon.

Asus phones

• Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for

a cou­ple of se­conds. • Pull down the no­ti­fi­ca­tion panel to reach quick

set­tings and tap the Screen­shot icon.

Google phones

• Nexus: Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds. • Pix­els: Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds.

HTC phones

• HTC U se­ries: Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds. • HTC 10: Hold down the home and power but­tons OR hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds. • All other HTC phones: Hold down the power but­ton and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds.

Huawei and Honor phones

• Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds. • Pull down the no­ti­fi­ca­tion panel, switch to Short­cuts, and tap the Screen­shot icon.

Len­ovo phones

• Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds. • Pull down the no­ti­fi­ca­tion panel and tap the Screen Shot icon.

LG phones

• Hold down the power (lo­cated on the back of the phone) and the vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds. • Pull down the no­ti­fi­ca­tion panel and tap the Cap­ture+ icon.

Mo­torola phones

• Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds.

Sam­sung phones

• Galaxy S8 and Note 8: Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds. • Galaxy S7 and ear­lier: Hold down the home and power but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds.

Sony phones

• Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds. • Hold down the power key un­til a screen ap­pears and tap Take screen­shot.

ZTE phones

• Hold down the power and vol­ume-down but­tons for a cou­ple of se­conds.

Google As­sis­tant

On sup­ported phones, you can also ask Google As­sis­tant to take a screen­shot for you. When you’re on the screen you want to snap, just say, “OK Google, take a screen­shot,” and it will oblige, sav­ing a pic­ture of the screen be­low the As­sis­tant in­ter­face. So if you want to cap­ture the Google As­sis­tant screen it­self, you’ll have to use the hard­ware but­tons.

Save and share

Once you’ve snapped your screen­shot you can cre­ate a short­cut to it in the no­ti­fi­ca­tion panel. Tap it and you’ll be able to edit or share it.

If you want to back up your screen­shots to Google Pho­tos, you might need to tell your phone to do so. Open the side­bar in Google Pho­tos, then De­vice

Folder. Tap Screen­shots, and flip the Back up & sync tog­gle. From there on out, all of your screen­shots will be backed up to your cam­era roll in Google Pho­tos.

An­droid Froyo phones and older

If you hap­pen to have a pre-Ginger­bread An­droid 2.3 phone ly­ing around, tak­ing a screen­shot is quite an ar­du­ous task. Froyo users will need a PC, a USB ca­ble, some An­droid know-how and third-party soft­ware.

In­stall the Soft­ware

Back in those days, Google thought only de­vel­op­ers would be in­ter­ested in cap­tur­ing An­droid screen­shots, so you’ll have to act like one. Down­load and in­stall the free An­droid SDK (soft­ware devel­op­ment kit). Visit

the site ( fave.co/2rQ7A7x), and be sure to get the cor­rect ver­sion for your op­er­at­ing sys­tem.

The soft­ware also re­quires Java. Mac OS X has the right tools al­ready built in. Win­dows users should down­load the Java Devel­op­ment Kit ( fave.co/2nmGsZ9). In­stall the An­droid SDK and Java down­loads. Launch the SDK Man­ager from the An­droid SDK down­load. (In Win­dows, if prompted, choose Ex­tract All.) Ac­cept the terms, and click In­stall. The SDK will down­load more pack­ages and then up­date it­self with the lat­est files. This process can take about 30 min­utes.

Launch DDMS (Dalvik De­bug Mon­i­tor) within the An­droid SDK Tools folder. The soft­ware will open a con­sole for a mo­ment and then launch a graph­i­cal in­ter­face in an­other win­dow. Give it a mo­ment, but if it quits and there seems to be an er­ror ini­tially –

as hap­pened to me on my test sys­tems – try run­ning DDMS again.

On the An­droid de­vice, open Set­ting, Ap­pli­ca­tion set­tings, Devel­op­ment, and se­lect USB de­bug­ging. Con­nect the An­droid de­vice to your com­puter.

In Win­dows, if the An­droid doesn’t ap­pear as a list­ing in the Dalvik De­bug Mon­i­tor ap­pli­ca­tion, go to the De­vice Man­ager. Right-click the An­droid de­vice, and se­lect Up­date Driver Soft­ware. Choose Browse my com­puter for driver soft­ware, click Browse, and nav­i­gate to the USB driver folder within the An­droid SDK folder. Click Next. Ap­prove the fol­low­ing prompt to in­stall the driver. Re­turn to the Dalvik De­bug Mon­i­tor; your Droid should now be listed.

With ei­ther OS, if your An­droid de­vice still failed to show up in the Dalvik De­bug Mon­i­tor, ver­ify that you set it for USB de­bug­ging mode. In ad­di­tion, drag

Google Pixel 2

To back up your screen­shots, you’ll need to head over to Google Pho­tos

Ig­nore the Log, Info, and other de­vel­op­er­centric details. The screen­shot op­tion is in the De­vice menu

Visit the De­vice Man­ager to fix any USB driver is­sues prevent­ing your PC from rec­og­niz­ing your An­droid de­vice

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