DAVE HAR­RELL: RIVER SE­CRETS

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Angling Times (UK) - - TIPS & TACTICS -

AST week I took you through my favourite rigs for deep-wa­ter pole fish­ing on rivers.

This week we’re look­ing at the lighter end of the scale, where del­i­cate pre­sen­ta­tion will re­sult in more fish be­ing caught.

These rigs are suited to depths from 3ft to 6ft and, like the deep rigs, I’d al­ways rec­om­mend mak­ing them up on winders at home to save time on the bank.

LINE LENGTH?

I make all my light rigs up equal to the length of four or five sec­tions of pole and then shorten them if nec­es­sary on the bank.

SHOTS OR STYLS?

I al­ways to use small shots. All my rigs are made up with No8, No9 and No10 shots. The only time I use lighter is when I need a tiny shot to fine tune a rig and set the bris­tle so that just un­der half of it is show­ing above the sur­face.

CAR­BON OR WIRE STEMS?

All my light floats have car­bon stems as I think they per­form bet­ter than thin wire. They are also more durable with car­bon and much less prone to bend­ing dam­age.

WHAT BRIS­TLES?

While su­per-fine bris­tles might look pretty in tackle shops, in re­al­ity they are of­ten a night­mare to see and fish with on river pole floats. They’re also dif­fi­cult to shot up prop­erly.

I’ve used many dif­fer­ent pole float pat­terns for river fish­ing and in my opin­ion hol­low 1.5mm bris­tles are the best. Length of bris­tle is very im­por­tant – I think too many pole-float pat­terns have bris­tles that are much too long.

For river fish­ing this can be a prob­lem if you want to slow the rig down. The bris­tle will just ride up out of the wa­ter in­stead of the float body be­ing held against it.

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