Steve Smythe’s in-depth look at the women’s per­for­mances in Lon­don

STEVE SMYTHE CON­TIN­UES HIS STA­TIS­TI­CAL ANAL­Y­SIS BY RE­VIEW­ING THE WOMEN’S EVENTS, AGAIN LOOK­ING AHEAD IN RE­LA­TION TO NEXT YEAR’S COM­MON­WEALTH GAMES AND EURO CHAM­PI­ONSHIPS

Athletics Weekly - - News - PIC­TURES: MARK SHEAR­MAN

RECORDS were in short sup­ply but the athletics was com­pelling and the at­mos­phere was elec­tric thanks to the record-break­ing crowds. Doha will surely see faster sprint times but it will be un­likely to match up else­where.

100m

ALL three medal­lists got faster as they pro­gressed through the rounds with Tori Bowie’s dive edg­ing it by a sin­gle hun­dredth of a sec­ond in the fi­nal.

The fastest in the cham­pi­onships was Olympic win­ner and world no.1 Elaine Thomp­son who ran 10.84 in her semi, but ham­pered by her Achilles prob­lem, only 10.98 in the fi­nal.

The quick­est heat win­ner, Gina Luck­enkem­per, ran 10.95 in that race but was a poor sixth in her semi in 11.16.

It was the first time ever that ei­ther USA or Ja­maica did not have a dou­ble fi­nal­ist but both Ivory Coast and Trinidad and Tobago did.

No Bri­ton was close to mak­ing the fi­nal but Daryll Neita should be in two years’ time and an 11.15 heat and 11.16 semi was close to her 11.14 PB.

Tori Bowie: no dip of form in the fi­nal for the Amer­i­can

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