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BBC Wildlife Magazine - - Reviews Books -

BATS ARE FAS­CI­NAT­ING mam­mals thanks to their abil­ity to fly and echolo­cate. They of­ten roost in houses and other build­ings and for­age within vil­lages or towns, so ev­ery­body has the chance to see them.

THEY USU­ALLY HI­BER­NATE

at this time of year – it’s eas­ier to see them in sum­mer. But if it is a warm win­ter, with day-time tem­per­a­tures over 10°C, some species such as the com­mon pip­istrelle ( right) and noc­tule may be on the wing, hunt­ing in­sects near bod­ies of wa­ter.

NEVER DIS­TURB

hi­ber­nat­ing or roost­ing bats – they are pro­tected by law.

TO SEARCH FOR BATS

you need a good torch, a bat de­tec­tor to hear their calls, a note­book and a field guide.

THE BAT CON­SER­VA­TION TRUST

has de­tails of friendly lo­cal groups as well as a Big Bat Map of hotspots and sight­ings: www.bats.org.uk.

are the au­thors of Bats of Bri­tain and Europe (Blooms­bury, £30.00, pub­lished 28 Jan­uary 2016): www.blooms­bury.com

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