BUY­ING KTM’S 950/990…

The first KTM V-twin wins the 2002 Dakar, and it’s just a pro­to­type. A year later it’s also the firm’s first big ad­ven­ture bike. From hum­ble be­gin­nings...

BIKE (UK) - - CONTENTS -

… Ad­ven­ture. Liv­ing that Dakar dream from just £2500.

FUEL PUMP PROB­LEMS

If your bike stalls at traf­fic lights or loses power when ac­cel­er­at­ing past 3000rpm, don’t jump to the con­clu­sion your fuel pump is out. The same fuel pump was in use from 20032013 and we’ve re­placed less than ten of them. It’s more likely the fuel fil­ter’s clogged: £120 for new fil­ter and labour.

SER­VIC­ING

Al­ter­nat­ing ser­vices: the £250 mi­nor at 4500 is oil and fil­ter (plus clean­ing the oil screen fil­ter), and brake flu­ids ev­ery two years; a 9000-mile ma­jor ser­vice costs £500 and in­cludes valve clear­ances and spark plugs. The clutch oil jet must be cleaned ev­ery ma­jor ser­vice. If it’s missed out your clutch be­comes starved of oil, will not en­gage/dis­en­gage prop­erly and the bike will creep in gear.

WA­TER PUMP

Early 950s were re­called to fix a wa­ter pump seal is­sue. There are two oil seals on the wa­ter pump with a drain hole be­tween nd them. If a seal breaks, coolant drains through this hole slowly. The re­call up­graded seals – a kit to fix the prob­lem costs £59.82. Plan for £120 labour. Check your bike’s VIN num­ber with a KTM dealer to con­firm the work has been done. The is­sue ef­fected 990s.

TWO FUEL TANKS

Ad­ven­tures carry twin fuel tanks, one each side. Why? Firstly, if a crash dam­ages one side, you switch off the cor­re­spond­ing fuel tap (be­low ra­di­a­tor) and run on the other tank. Se­condly, to make tanks eas­ier to re­move for ser­vic­ing. Ironic then that ethanol in mod­ern fu­els de­forms the plas­tic tanks, adding an hour in labour.

FIN­ISH

Th­ese early Ad­ven­tures are well-fin­ished, but need look­ing af­ter in bad weather. Use ACFž50 anti-cor­ro­sion spray on the bike’s ex­posed alu­minium, and coat nickel-plated wheel spokes in a ce­ramic clearcoat. It paints on and dries clear, pro­tect­ing the spokes for two years.

LOW END FU­ELLING

Gl­itchy low speed fu­elling on in­jected bikes can be cured with a free flow­ing exhaust and the right fu­elling map. Stock ex­hausts are heavy and build up heat at the cat-con­tain­ing si­lencer. Junk them for Akrapovic or FMF sys­tems that can add £300 to used value.

COLD EN­GINE CLATTER

A rat­tle at the cylin­ders on start-up that qui­etens as oil pres­sure in­creases sug­gests worn hy­draulic cam chain ten­sion­ers. £29.16/cylin­der, £80 in labour.

SOUNDS LIKE A DRY CLUTCH...

Is your clutch as rat­tly as a Du­cati dry? Your clutch booster needs re­plac­ing. This in­creases pres­sure on the clutch plates un­der load, re­duc­ing clutch slip. But it be­comes rat­tly with wear, and makes clutch op­er­a­tion notchy. Needs re­plac­ing af­ter 50,000 miles: £320 to­tal.

WHERE IS MY BAT­TERY?

Look­ing for your Ad­ven­ture’s elec­tron­ics? The bat­tery, reg/rec and starter re­lay are hid­den un­der the ra­di­a­tor, be­hind the sump guard. Pro­tect the elec­tri­cal har­ness from wa­ter ingress and cor­ro­sion by clean­ing and re­greas­ing all con­nec­tors. Most charg­ing is­sues stem from the con­nec­tors (£26), not the reg/rec (£91). A volt­age read­ing should be in the low-14s.

CLUTCH SLAVE FAIL­URE

This is a com­mon is­sue. The in­ter­nal seal can fail, cut­ting hy­draulic pres­sure at the lever. Gears won’t dis­en­gage. Fit a £92 Oberon slave cylin­der: cheaper than the £128 OE, much more re­li­able and, help­fully, you can buy re­place­ment seals separately.

HOME SER­VIC­ING

An easy en­gine to ser­vice for the type of bike. How­ever, get­ting to the oil filler cap is dif­fi­cult. It’s hid­den by the fuel tank, so use an oil jug with an ex­tended flex­i­ble spout. It takes 3 litres ex­actly.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.