ID tips & tricks

Bird Watching (UK) - - Top Tip! -

Many birds which in­cor­po­rate song flights into their ter­ri­to­rial dis­play will also sing from a perch or from the ground. Even that most famed of aerial song­sters, the Sky Lark, will de­liver its song from a perch on oc­ca­sion, though the ‘high al­ti­tude’ far-reach­ing broad­cast of the Sky Lark’s song is much more ef­fec­tive at cover­ing a wide area of ter­ri­tory. The Wood Lark, on the other hand, will read­ily sing from a high perch or from song flight from up to 150m al­ti­tude. Sim­i­larly, Tree Pip­its sing from a high perch, usu­ally con­tin­u­ing the song ris­ing up singing, be­fore parachut­ing slowly down with their feet dan­gling be­low. Few of our war­blers opt to use a song flight, with the no­table ex­cep­tions of the Whitethroat and the Sedge War­bler. Both these species will also read­ily sing from a perch, al­most us­ing the song flight as an oc­ca­sional added ex­tra. Aware­ness of which species em­ploy song flights is a use­ful ID tool.

Few of our war­blers opt to use a song flight, with the no­table ex­cep­tions of the Whitethroat and the Sedge War­bler. Both these species will also read­ily sing from a perch, al­most us­ing the song flight as an oc­ca­sional added ex­tra

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.