SUPERSUCK

GE­ORGE PICK­ING TALKS SHACKS AND GETS PIT­TED.

Carve - - TRIPPERS -

In­done­sia: sun­shine, Bin­tangs, par­ties and of course full of end­less waves. Mostly lefts, which be­ing a goofy footer is a big bonus. I’ve been to Indo a few times and spent a month there each time. I usu­ally don’t get to drag my­self out of Bali too much; I went to Lakeys once and Nusa Lem­bon­gan too. If you don’t get wrapped up in the in­fa­mous party scene too much then there is one thing you can guar­an­tee: there are waves to be had, and if you put the time in, maybe some of the best bar­rels of your life. Ul­ti­mately that’s what we all come here for time and time again.

I'd spent the last four years try­ing to knuckle down and get through my elec­tri­cian ap­pren­tice­ship with the goal in mind that I would fin­ish just in time to get to Indo and spend a solid three months trav­el­ling to all the waves I hadn’t yet surfed. My one aim for the trip was to get at least a cou­ple good ses­sions of proper kegs with Desert Point high on the list.

So with an ipod full of mu­sic, a fresh quiver from LC Surf­boards and a hunger for a nasi goreng I flew to Bali the day af­ter my fi­nal ex­ams.

Af­ter spend­ing a few weeks around the Bukit I joined up with a cou­ple of mates and we headed to Sum­bawa. I wanted to try out Lakeys again, af­ter such good mem­o­ries five years pre­vi­ous, so I went there with my girl­friend for 10 days be­fore driv­ing to Sum­bawa to meet up with the boys.

Lakeys was fun, but noth­ing spe­cial, and full of an­gry, loud, ob­nox­ious Brazil­ians that killed ev­ery­ones vibe. I was keen to check out West Sum­bawa as I’d heard so many good things. 10 hours in a sweaty, wind­ing, slightly ter­ri­fy­ing, but in­cred­i­bly stun­ning car jour­ney across Sum­bawa and we ar­rived at Yoyos. The boys checked us into Yoyo’s Beach Homes­tay, owned by a big Aussie called Mick, who has lived there for around six years and knows the place like the back of his hand. He’s an in­tim­i­dat­ing look­ing guy at the best of times and in the wa­ter he rules the roost. No­body pad­dles for his wave, and if they do they soon know about it. He was ac­tu­ally a re­ally good char­ac­ter on land, but I think he had to let his demons out in the sea. It was en­ter­tain­ing to watch.

I'd heard of the wave named Supersuck a few times in the past but also had heard how fickle the wave was out of the main sea­son be­tween June and Septem­ber so I didn’t hold my hopes up on get­ting out there. We spent a cou­ple weeks surf­ing Yoyos and Trop­i­cals every­day, su­per rip­pable lefts and rights and tak­ing in the in­cred­i­ble scenery. I hon­estly have not been to

So with an ipod full of mu­sic, a fresh quiver from LC Surf­boards and a hunger for a nasi goreng I flew to Bali the day af­ter my fi­nal ex­ams.

an­other place quite like it. It feels as if you’re surf­ing in a set for Juras­sic Park.

Then things started to look re­ally promis­ing. We saw on the fore­cast that there was a medium to large swell ar­riv­ing and with Mick's knowl­edge he tipped us off that it could be good for Supersuck. We left early in the morn­ing with a cou­ple boards on the rack and on ar­rival I stood to watch some of the ugli­est, least invit­ing, un­sur­fa­ble waves I had ever seen grind down reef with no­body out. I then bumped into the lo­cal pho­tog­ra­pher San­tos, who we had be­come friends with. I looked at him with a bit of dis­ap­point­ment as I had ex­pected to be greeted with the sight of per­fect lefts and he had a grin on his face that made me think he knew some­thing I didn’t.

'In 2 hours it’s gonna be pump­ing,' he said. I didn’t quite be­lieve it my­self but I couldn’t ar­gue with his lo­cal knowl­edge. He was get­ting his cam­era gear ready and I was hes­i­tantly prep­ping my boards.

As we watched the sets come in, each one was more promis­ing, peel­ing bet­ter and more per­fect, with less wob­ble and more con­sis­tent. Then the Volcom team turned up: Mitch Cole­born, Ozzie Wright and Noa Deane with a cam­era crew in tow - it was on!

I got changed as quickly as I could as I watched the Volcom boys jump on a boat to take them out to the lineup. Nathan, Jamie and

I pad­dled from the beach up the edge of the reef in the chan­nel and watched the most hol­low, round, thick, Pringle-like tubes I had ever seen un­load on the reef in front of us. It was a lot more in­tim­i­dat­ing out there than I had imag­ined. The tide was still a lit­tle low for it which made the take offs seem al­most im­pos­si­ble but it didn’t stop Noa and the boys show us how its done.

I’ve surfed all over the world from Hawaii to Aus­tralia and all around Europe and I had never seen a wave like it. It’s ba­si­cally a slab that runs for about 300 me­tres but once you make the drop you just set your line and you’re in. Af­ter snag­ging a cou­ple small ones to get in the groove of things I wanted to get a proper one, like I’d seen Ozzie and Mitch get. I reckon I must have blown al­most 10 de­cent sized ones back to back be­fore fi­nally mak­ing a bomb. The feel­ing of mak­ing those ones was pretty spe­cial, I’ve had plenty of bar­rels over the years but that wave is crazy, it’s so fast, so shal­low and the reef is so sharp its un­for­giv­ing, you re­ally feel you’ve earned it when you come out of those things.

As the day went on the waves got more and more per­fect, I spent six hours in the surf all through the tide and man­aged to get some of the best bar­rels of my life along side some of my favourite surfers ... It doesn’t get much bet­ter than that!

I’ve surfed all over the world from Hawaii to Aus­tralia and all around Europe and I had never seen a wave like it. It’s ba­si­cally a slab that runs for about 300 me­tres but once you make the drop you just set your line and you’re in.

Don’t get this at south Fis­tral.

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