AMAZ­ING WAVES

DIVE IN TO OUR BRAND NEW COF­FEE TA­BLE BOOK STUFFED TO THE GILLS WITH WAVE PICS THAT’LL MAKE YOU DROOL... WE ASKED A BUNCH OF PHO­TOG­RA­PHERS IN­VOLVED A FEW QUES­TIONS IN THE PROCESS OF MAK­ING THE BOOK AND DIDN’T HAVE ENOUGH ROOM TO FIT IN ALL THE AN­SWERS SO

Carve - - CONTENTS - WORDS BY SHARPY

Not to blow our own trum­pet but we've just done an ridicu­lously good book of waves that you're go­ing to love.

For many of us, our ear­li­est mem­o­ries of the beach are of jump­ing over waves. Even as in­fants we no­tice the pe­cu­liar rhythm of the ocean and how the waves come in groups. The green flag days when we were al­lowed to play were rel­ished. Red flag days when the waves were too dan­ger­ous were mar­velled at.

This fas­ci­na­tion with ocean en­ergy leads peo­ple to be­come wave-rid­ers, swim­mers, life­guards and even surf pho­tog­ra­phers. Seek­ing out waves of all shapes and sizes is what we do. Our con­nec­tion to the ocean is strong. Know­ing how waves work is es­sen­tial, play­ing in their power is one of the most ex­cit­ing things you can do, how­ever you choose to do it. This book is a cel­e­bra­tion of the raw beauty of waves around the world.

The pho­tog­ra­phers that help make it are a crazy bunch of ob­ses­sives that re­ally should go get a real job as the re­wards are pal­try but we’re glad they weather all the storms to record Mama Nature’s finest show. Here’s a few of the gents:

WHAT MAKES A GOOD WAVE PHOTO?

Back­drops. A big pow­er­ful back­ground in a lineup shot tells more of a story than a wave by it­self. It cre­ates a sense of cu­rios­ity and won­der “Where the hell is that?!”

MAR­CUS PALADINO

For me, a good wave photo has to be some­thing in­cred­i­bly unique - whether it be weird light/weather com­bi­na­tions, a fresh an­gle or just sim­ply one of those ou­tra­geous 'once in a blue moon' mo­ments where you're lucky enough to be aim­ing your cam­era in the right di­rec­tion.

JOSH TABONE

I tend like think a good wave photo con­sists of mood colours and con­trast. Plus some move­ment as well. Perfect sunny im­ages are great, but dark im­ages con­vey more of a story.

RODD OWEN

A good wave photo pulls the viewer in It's the way that you mind surf that thing to death. Usu­ally the wave it­self might be un­make­able in re­al­ity but that 1/1000 sec­ond frozen mo­ment tells us some­thing dif­fer­ent. There are a mil­lion dif­fer­ent tiny de­tails in there, there are re­flec­tions in ev­ery colour and shade imag­in­able and since it's some­thing unique which will never ever hap­pen in ex­act same way again ... it's just mind blow­ing to watch. A good wave photo will stop the viewer, it'll feed your imag­i­na­tion the more you look at it. It's unique and it's just some­thing only a Mother Nature can paint.

TIMO JARVINEN

To me a good wave photo is still a pic­ture of a wave that is sur­fa­ble. Or at least looks like it might be ... You can add any com­bi­na­tion of amaz­ing light, wa­ter clar­ity or ex­otic lo­ca­tion but the key in­gre­di­ent is the mind-surf fac­tor. That mightn’t make me too pop­u­lar with 90 per­cent of the surf pho­tog­ra­phers I see on Instagram, but their weird mu­tated slabs and oddly shaped back­washes don’t do it for me ;)

SHIELDSY

WHAT'S THE WORST THING THAT'S HAP­PENED TO YOU WHILE SHOOT­ING WAVES?

I was shoot­ing from the wa­ter at a lo­cal break and the cur­rent was ridicu­lously pow­er­ful. So strong that I even­tu­ally got ripped around the point and into the low tide river mouth. I was strug­gling to get out of this po­si­tion, as I was get­ting pulled out by the flow of the river but get­ting pushed in by waves break­ing. I even­tu­ally lost my bal­ance and got swept by a wave. Caus­ing my hous­ing to smash against a rock and flood my en­tire cam­era. By the time I had no­ticed, it was too late. To make mat­ters worse, all of my equip­ment was unin­sured.

MAR­CUS PALADINO

I was in Mex­ico a few years back and had swam out at this wedgey shore­break one arvo, to try and cool off from the ex­treme heat. It was a bit junky and the swell was fore­casted to rise for some all time con­di­tions later in the week.

It didn't take long for the new swell to start to show her teeth, as each set that rolled through seemed to get big­ger and big­ger. I was slowly drift­ing fur­ther and fur­ther down the beach but that was cool, as there were less guys around and 'twas a lit­tle more hol­low. A rogue A-frame peak caught me off guard and I was kinda stuck half­way - where I didn't know whether to swim in or swim out to it - I chose the lat­ter and got stung pretty hard. The lip pitched and landed about one meter in front of me. I tried to swim deep but it was waist depth.

Yeah ... nope!

The power of Mother Nature is one not to be messed with, it ripped ev­ery­thing from my posses­sion: fins, wa­ter-hous­ing and even had a go at my shorts. In the chaos un­der­wa­ter, my wa­ter-hous­ing (still at­tached to my wrist) coiled back and col­lided heav­ily with my chin putting me to sleep mo­men­tar­ily.

When I woke up, I was face-down in the wa­ter which caused me to en­gulf a few too many mouth­fuls of it. I spent the next hour or so cough­ing it all back up. I some­how made it back to shore, fought off the mil­lions of mos­qui­toes along the track and jumped in the first taxi home.

the power of mother nature is one not to be messed with

My chin bled pro­fusely all the way back and lucky for me, the lady who owned our ho­tel was a nurse so she was able to help me out. She cleaned out the gap­ing wound and trans­lated through her son that stitches were re­quired asap.

I quickly got changed and she rushed me off to the near­est hos­pi­tal. It was packed to the rafters, full of scream­ing chil­dren and peo­ple much worse off than me. I saw a man with his col­lar bone pro­trud­ing through his skin and an­other hold­ing ban­dages around him over what looked to be gun shot or stab wounds - it was an eye opener to say the least - she in­sisted we try some­where else.

I ar­rived at a quiet place not too far from there, where I in­haled co­pi­ous amounts of happy gas upon en­try. 10 stitches later and I was out of there. But yeah, that's prob­a­bly the worst thing that has hap­pened to me whilst shoot­ing waves.

JOSH TABONE

Worst thing hap­pened would be get­ting sucked over the falls while shoot­ing Cape Fear many years ago, I in­jured my back and slit my head open. I also lost 10k worth of cam­era equip­ment . It's daunt­ing place to shoot at times...

RODD OWEN

By far the worst ex­pe­ri­ence I've had when shoot­ing waves is a pass­ing of Ma­lik Joyeux. That morn­ing Pipe­line was off the hook, max­ing out first reef. I swam out and as soon as I got to the line up I had to dive un­der a set. First wave some­one went, I was go­ing

to shoot it with fish­eye but when I saw the lip crum­bling a bit I opted to dive un­der it. A surfer took off and at that time I didn't spot it was Ma­lik. I popped up from the other side and as soon as I saw that I was good from the next wave I heard a scream from the chan­nel: 'Some­one got hurt!'.

It felt like be­ing thrown un­der an ice cold shower, and then the next 10-15 fran­tic min­utes of search were some I will never for­get. I've been clipped once re­ally bad with a first reef Pipe bomb, it hap­pened dur­ing Christmas 2003 and it's still the worst beat­ing of my life to date. A two wave hold down at La Graviere, creepy west bowls at Teahupo'o ... but those have noth­ing on los­ing a friend out there.

TIMO JARVINEN

HAVE YOU GOT THE BEST OF­FICE IN THE WORLD? Ab­so­lutely. I get to be sur­rounded by nature and doc­u­ment split sec­ond mo­ments that most peo­ple in the world don’t even know ex­ist. I get to put my­self in crit­i­cal sit­u­a­tions with tal­ented pro­fes­sion­als and come out the other side laugh­ing his­tor­i­cally in ex­cite­ment. There’s not bet­ter rush in the world!

MAR­CUS PALADINO

The of­fice is get­ting a lot more crowded th­ese days but that will never de­ter me. I'm pretty darn' lucky to have found some­thing that I love do­ing, whilst mak­ing a liv­ing. For­ever priv­i­leged to be able to call this my 'job' :)

JOSH TABONE

At times def­i­nitely. Trav­el­ling to far and wide places is what makes me tick. Even if I'm not shoot­ing it's what makes me tick.

RODD OWEN

In my book it is the best, most beau­ti­ful of­fice out there. It can have night­mar­ish el­e­ments from a real life cu­bi­cle life too. When the rip feels like some lower man­age­ment dick­head who's on your case all day long. There's so much go­ing on around you when you're swim­ming in the line up, that it's hard to de­scribe the kind of eu­pho­ria you go through. An­tic­i­pa­tion like that when it's pump­ing doesn't hap­pen in any other 'of­fice' I reckon. The en­ergy flow­ing through you, all that it's pretty unique.

TIMO JARVINEN

Wil­liam Aliotti and a mad an­gle from Ben Thouard who nailed the­cacrover­sshuort­foifngth­me­ab­goaozkine

Tassie dream­land point. This spot just reels for­ever on the rare days it works

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