BUY­ING TIPS

Classic Car Weekly (UK) - - Driving -

1 BODY SUR­VEY

The first thing prospec­tive buy­ers must check is the body­work – both what you can see and the un­der­side, be­cause the Mayflower fea­tures uni­tary con­struc­tion. Cor­ro­sion has killed off many Mayflow­ers over the years so any se­ri­ous rot means you should walk away. Un­less you’re par­tic­u­larly handy with a welder.

2 PANEL PER­FEC­TION

Find­ing re­place­ment body pan­els isn’t easy – re­mem­ber the Mayflower wasn’t built in large num­bers and many have al­ready been scrapped. If your car needs wings, doors, bootlid or even glass, then a donor car is go­ing to be your best bet if the own­ers’ club can’t help. Al­ter­na­tively, wait for a bet­ter ex­am­ple to sur­face.

3 HOW’S THE IN­TE­RIOR?

The in­te­rior is a rel­a­tively smart place to be but the age­ing process is likely to have taken its toll over the years. Seat fac­ings can de­te­ri­o­rate if ex­posed to the sun and door cards ex­posed to wa­ter ingress rot quickly. Head­lin­ings are vul­ner­a­ble to stain­ing and fail­ing ad­he­sive causes them to droop and fall away. Once again, a good donor car may be your saviour if any trim needs to be re­placed.

4 TAKE A DRIVE

A good ex­am­ple should have a smooth gearchange and the clutch should be light and un­ob­struc­tive. Even the best en­gines won’t give any more than av­er­age per­for­mance, but all should be rea­son­ably quiet and smooth in op­er­a­tion.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.