TIPS

Classic Car Weekly (UK) - - Driving -

1WATCH FOR RUST

Like many Bri­tish cars of the time, rust can be a se­ri­ous prob­lem. Check the bot­toms of the doors and the whee­larches, to­gether with wind­screen sur­rounds. Body panels are tricky to find in good con­di­tion, so try to buy as rust­free an ex­am­ple as you can.

2 UN­DER THE BONNET

Even the youngest en­gines are now ap­proach­ing 60 years old, so ev­i­dence of reg­u­lar ser­vic­ing and main­te­nance, ei­ther DIY or by a spe­cial­ist is de­sir­able. Key is­sues to watch out for in­clude a knock­ing bot­tom end, blue ex­haust smoke on the over­run and over­heat­ing caused by blocked wa­ter­ways and age­ing ra­di­a­tors in need of TLC.

3 IN­TE­RIOR MO­TIVES

Cab­ins can let in wa­ter in around the thin door rub­bers, so check damp car­pets. Head­lin­ings can hide all man­ner of rood nas­ties, while dam­aged or miss­ing trim is a real prob­lem – po­ten­tially a deal­breaker, in fact – be­cause spares are largely ex­tinct. Electrics are ba­sic and is­sues can usu­ally be eas­ily sorted.

4 STEER CLEAR!

Steer­ing tends to feel vague even on healthy, well-main­tained cars – the Her­ald is much bet­ter in this re­spect – but ex­cess play is a cause for con­cern. Wear in the wish­bones will re­sult in knock­ing. Check­ing the me­tal bushes is tricky once they’re fit­ted to the car, but check for wear.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.