MYTH BUSTER

De­bunk­ing the most com­mon old wives’ tales

Classic Car Weekly (UK) - - This Week - Richard Gunn

1 IT WAS NAMED AF­TER ITS NUM­BER OF IM­PROVE­MENTS

The 1964 Vaux­hall Victor FC was also known as the Victor 101. Of­fi­cially, Vaux­hall claimed that it was be­cause there were 101 im­prove­ments over the pre­vi­ous FB, but this as­ser­tion didn’t sur­face un­til a few years later. An­other the­ory is that it was the model’s 1594cc en­gine size in US cu­bic inches – ex­cept that would be 97ci – it would have needed a 1655cc en­gine for that to hold true. In re­al­ity, it was to es­tab­lish a num­ber se­ries so changes would be eas­ier to iden­tify in the fu­ture.

2 IT IN­TRO­DUCED CURVED SIDE WIN­DOWS

It’s com­monly be­lieved that the FC was the first Vaux­hall with curved side win­dows, to help cre­ate more cabin space. Ac­tu­ally, the FC was beaten to this trick by the 1963 Viva HA. How­ever, the FC went much fur­ther than the HA, with a pro­nounced bow to both its side glass and pan­els which was dubbed ‘space-curve’ be­cause it gave an ex­tra four inches of shoul­der wrig­gle-room inside, de­spite only be­ing three-quar­ters-of-an-inch wider on the out­side.

3 IT WAS MORE COR­RO­SION-PROOF THAN ITS PRE­DE­CES­SOR

Lu­ton-mo­biles had a poor rust rep­u­ta­tion thanks to the crumbly Velox/Cresta PAs and Victor HAs of the 1950s. In a bid to shift this legacy, the FC in­cluded co­pi­ous amounts of phos­phat­ing, bi­tu­men, and Plas­ti­col and mas­tic sealer. Un­for­tu­nately, Vaux­hall for­got about treat­ing wa­ter traps such as the chrome wing cap­pings, sills and lower wings, which proved ideal nest­ing spots for rust.

An im­prove­ment over the pre­vi­ous FB, but still prone to cor­ro­sion.

VAUX­HALL VICTOR 101

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