TRENG­WAIN­TON’S TOP GROW­ING TIPS

Country Living (UK) - - Food & Drink -

Soil prepa­ra­tion is key to a good har­vest – dou­ble-dig­ging with plenty of ma­nure may be old-fash­ioned, but it yields great re­sults.

Com­pan­ion plant­ing, whether to at­tract pol­li­nat­ing in­sects or drive away pests and dis­eases, is not only prac­ti­cal but also cre­ates in­ter­est. Marigolds seem to work well with most crops.

Don’t be afraid to ex­per­i­ment. When work­ing with chil­dren, it is re­ward­ing to see them try­ing a crop that they wouldn’t usu­ally come across at home or in the su­per­mar­ket, such as the rat tail radish.

OP­PO­SITE AND THIS

PAGE Ni­cola uses as many Treng­wain­ton-grown fruit, veg­eta­bles and herbs in her menu as pos­si­ble, as well as eggs from their hens, while nas­tur­tiums and Cape goose­ber­ries dec­o­rate the plates; other in­gre­di­ents are mostly sourced from Cor­nish pro­duc­ers. Laven­der is one of the vari­a­tions of Ni­cola’s pop­u­lar short­bread and flavours the pas­try of her lemon tart

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