Com­ments from small­hold­ers

Country Smallholding - - Feature Breeding Success -

DAVE CHURCH, PEM­BROKESHIRE

Even when our does are in their ‘ma­ter­nity barn’, if the weather/con­di­tions are good, we let them out daily as ex­er­cise is still good for preg­nant stock.

VICKI WOOD­WARD, DEVON

If a new­born’s mouth is cold, don’t try to feed it as it won’t be able to digest the food and it will give it belly ache. Gently bring the an­i­mal’s core tem­per­a­ture up to nor­mal range then, once the mouth is warm, tube it, ide­ally with mum’s colostrum.

YVONNE N VINCE LAY, OX­FORD­SHIRE

If you need to warm a baby lamb all over and you’re on your own and have an­other lamb com­ing, place the first lamb in a tub of warm wa­ter as it mim­ics be­ing in­side the womb... keep the head above wa­ter with a ring float around it.

LOR­RAINE TURN­BULL, FRANCE

Tube feed­ing is an art, not to be at­tempted by some­one who doesn’t know what they are do­ing as you could drown the lamb.

ISLA AN­DER­SON, ABERDEENSHIRE

Tick­ling the nose with a piece of straw will make a new­born sneeze out any liq­uid from its lungs.

JENI PAR­SONS, CAR­MARTHEN­SHIRE

We lamb out­side and the three most im­por­tant things are vig­i­lance, even at 3am, a head torch, and an ex­pe­ri­enced neigh­bour.

KATY MCDER­MOTT, LE­ICES­TER­SHIRE

We’re very care­ful to give lambs and ewes 48 hours to bond be­fore they go out, and we put bales out for lambs to es­cape the wind / rain.

DAWN MCHUGH, CAR­MARTHEN­SHIRE

Once our girls had kid­ded we gave them a bucket of warm wa­ter with mo­lasses in; they gulped it down. The vet sug­gested this as a good en­ergy re­place­ment.

NICK FLUX, SOM­ER­SET

Don’t worry. Don’t panic. Less is more. If you worry, you will worry about things that aren’t wrong. Some­times your ewes know best. Don’t get your­self tired - that’s when you miss things. Lamb­ing should be a joy not a chore.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from UK

© PressReader. All rights reserved.