NOVEM­BER

AU­TUMN ON LOCH LEVEN, HIGH­LANDS

Countryfile Magazine - - Contents -

› Au­tumn colour hotspots. › How to make kin­dling. › Mush­room ID guide.

Like many great im­ages, Dave Bow­man’s – short­listed for the ‘Liv­ing the view’ cat­e­gory in the Land­scape Pho­tog­ra­pher of the Year Awards 2015 –

al­most didn’t hap­pen. “I’d cal­cu­lated when the Novem­ber sun would high­light the au­tumn colours on the small is­land but the scene wasn’t liv­ing up to expectations. I had a large area to the right of my frame with no real in­ter­est. Out of the cor­ner of my eye I no­ticed a ca­noeist leav­ing the loch

bank. As luck would have it, he pad­dled just where I needed him.” All win­ning and short­listed im­ages from this year’s com­pe­ti­tion can be found in Land­scape Pho­tog­ra­pher of the Year: Col­lec­tion 9

(AA Pub­lish­ing, £25), www.take-a-view.co.uk

CLOVELLY HER­RING FES­TI­VAL, DEVON

The steep, car-free, pre­car­i­ously cob­bled lanes of the north Devon town of Clovelly draw you down to­wards a per­fect tiny har­bour, sur­rounded by cliffs. When you visit to­day, it’s hard to be­lieve this was once the cen­tre of a large, valu­able her­ring fish­ery but the an­nual her­ring fes­ti­val, held on 15 Novem­ber this year, pro­vides echoes of the port’s past glo­ries. Ex­plore fish­ing boats, sam­ple her­rings in many dif­fer­ent guises and join in with sea shanties. Lo­cal her­ring smoker and mar­itime his­to­rian Mike Smylie (above) will be on hand to tell tales. www.clovelly.co.uk/clovelly-events/clovel­ly­her­ring-fes­ti­val

ROBINS RULE

A robin vies with blue tits for the choic­est tid­bits from fat­balls left out by a gen­er­ous home­owner. If you feed your gar­den birds, you’ll no­tice them re­turn­ing in greater num­bers as the month goes on. Birds pre­fer wild food but as this dwin­dles, they turn to easy pickings from feed­ers and ta­bles.

Sin­u­ous beech trees stretch to­wards the win­ter’s light – a far cry from the densely leaf-clad gi­ants of sum­mer and au­tumn. Note how there is a dis­tinc­tive gap be­tween each tree

canopy, a phe­nom­e­non known as ‘crown sky­ness’. This might oc­cur to pre­vent trees

dam­ag­ing each other in high winds . This wood­land is within the Cran­borne Chase AONB on the Dorset-Wilt­shire border – a quiet land of chalk downs, gin-clear trout streams and

vil­lages barely touched by moder­nity.

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