Farm­house kitchen

A FAVOURITE SEA­SONAL RECIPE TO ENJOY THIS MONTH HOME­MADE CIDER VINE­GAR BY RACHELLE BLON­DEL

Countryfile Magazine - - Lazy Days -

The won­ders of us­ing vine­gar medic­i­nally date back hun­dreds of years. As well as making a tasty salad dress­ing, cider vine­gar is a great nat­u­ral an­ti­sep­tic that can be used safely about the home for clean­ing. A tea­spoon of honey with a splash of vine­gar is said to do won­ders for your health. A juicer is use­ful to get as much liq­uid from the ap­ples as pos­si­ble but a blen­der and a mesh food-strain­ing bag will work too. Do use proper cider yeast and not baker’s yeast in­stead, as the re­sults could be dire. Be­gin by juic­ing your ap­ples. If you’re go­ing down the blen­der route, chop the ap­ples and blend them to a fine pulp. Leave in a cool place to drain overnight, then squeeze as much juice as you can. Place the juice into a large jar with a spoon­ful or two of the pulp. Add cider yeast (fol­low­ing the man­u­fac­turer’s in­struc­tions) and give it a good stir. Place muslin over the top of the jar, seal it with an elas­tic band and leave it to fer­ment at room tem­per­a­ture for at least four weeks. Give the mix­ture a swirl now and then, and re­move any foam by skim­ming it off the top. Once the liq­uid tastes sour and vine­gar-like, it’s ready to go. Strain into a ster­ilised bot­tle with a tight-fit­ting lid or cork. Add some of this to your next batch and it should speed the process along nicely.

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