It’s al­most as if the Road­ma­chine can, at times, feel like an ex­ten­sion of your body as you climb out of the sad­dle

Cyclist - - Bikes -

too but in terms of ver­ti­cal com­pli­ance, more like the Gran­fondo. The dif­fer­ence though is the “in the sad­dle” feel, which is due to the com­pli­ant seat­post, wide tyres and more com­pli­ant seat­stays. The Road­ma­chine is no­tice­ably more com­fort­able.’

No non­sense

As I got to know the Road­ma­chine 01 around some of my reg­u­lar routes in the North Dorset lanes it quickly be­came ap­par­ent that the strong­est in­flu­ence in its DNA was from the Team­ma­chine. I opted to set it up with a fairly racy stance up front, us­ing the lower of the two head­set ‘cones’ (a taller op­tion is avail­able al­low­ing scope for a more re­laxed rid­ing po­si­tion, with­out need­ing an un­sightly stack of spac­ers). Pitch­ing my­self into a fairly ag­gres­sive rid­ing po­si­tion cer­tainly seemed to en­cour­age some fast-paced ef­forts and I was im­pressed with the re­sponse from the bike. It’s cer­tainly solid at its core, as the strong­est pedal strokes I could muster were met with no dis­cern­able flex or lag in terms of the way my ef­forts were con­verted into speed. The DT Swiss Spline RC38 car­bon wheels felt lat­er­ally stiff, re­in­forc­ing the rigid per­sona of the frame.

Climb­ing on the BMC, two things stood out as par­tic­u­larly pleas­ing. First off, no disc brake rub. It’s some­thing that plagues so many of the disc brake bikes I’ve rid­den, driv­ing me to dis­trac­tion on a ride. Thank­fully the BMC stood firm and silent. The sec­ond is harder to ex­plain, but it’s al­most as if the Road­ma­chine can, at times, feel like an ex­ten­sion of your body as you climb out of the sad­dle. Rock­ing the bike with metro­nomic side-to-side move­ments on a steep

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