LEARN TO POSE WITH PER­FEC­TION

Pro­fes­sional pho­tog­ra­pher Sa­mual Bouget shares some top tips for pos­ing your sub­jects

Digital Photograper - - Techniques -

1 ASYM­ME­TRY OF THE FACE

if you no­tice that some parts of the face are asym­met­ric (it can be the mouth, the nose, the eye­brows), then try to con­sider us­ing light and pos­ing to di­vert the look away from this asym­me­try, for greater in­ter­est. in terms of pos­ing, this can mean tilt­ing and/or turn­ing the head right or left to avoid fac­ing the model. in terms of light­ing, this can mean avoid­ing sim­plis­tic but­ter­fly light­ing.

2 PAY AT­TEN­TION TO THE ALIGN­MENT OF THE SHOUL­DERS

ask­ing the model to put their shoul­ders in three quar­ters view will gen­er­ally be an op­tion that works for ev­ery model. it will also add depth to your pic­tures with the line that the shoul­ders will draw.

3 SHAPE WITH HAIR

if the face is a bit round or square you may also use the hair to break this im­pres­sion by ask­ing the model to bring a few locks of hair on the sides of their face. Of course, in this case, avoid hav­ing the hair at­tached.

4 PO­SI­TION THE ARMS

if you are do­ing a side pro­file pic­ture and the model is bare armed, you may ask the model to de­tach their arm a lit­tle from the body and turn it slightly, as this will help the arm look less wide.

5 GET THEM MOV­ING

if you make a por­trait of some­body who feels uneasy be­cause they lack ex­pe­ri­ence for ex­am­ple, make them move if you want them to look more nat­u­ral in their pos­ing. Move­ment in gen­eral is a good tech­nique to con­sider if you want to con­vey some en­ergy.

6 BE AS FLAT­TER­ING AS POS­SI­BLE

There may be el­e­ments of a per­son’s body or face that you wish to ei­ther em­pha­sise or de-em­pha­sise. for ex­am­ple, if some­body has a large fore­head, you can use a longer lens and a slightly lower point of view to make it look less ob­vi­ous. if a per­son has a dou­ble chin, you may for ex­am­ple take a higher point of view to make it less vis­i­ble.

7 CHOOSE A LONGER LENS

With some sub­jects, opt­ing for a longer lens can be the most ap­pro­pri­ate choice. for ex­am­ple, if a per­son has a big nose and if you use a short lens, you will make it look big­ger, which might not be de­sir­able in the look you are go­ing for.

8 KEEP A PORT­FO­LIO OF YOUR SUC­CESS­FUL POSES

To fin­ish, the var­i­ous so­cial net­works that ex­ist to­day of­fer you the pos­si­bil­ity to make your own pos­ing guide by record­ing the poses that you find most flat­ter­ing (i mainly use in­sta­gram and pin­ter­est for this pur­pose). Don’t for­get that not ev­ery pose can be used for any sit­u­a­tion.

THE FO­CUS the pho­tog­ra­pher has en­sured that the sub­jects’ faces are beau­ti­fully il­lu­mi­nated, mak­ing them the fo­cal point of the shot EYE CON­TACT You don’t al­ways have to have eye con­tact with both your sub­jects. Here the back­ground sub­ject’s eye con­tact draws the viewer in

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