SHOOT AND EDIT A CITYSCAPE

A tri­pod ban needn’t stop you from shoot­ing pin-sharp low-light images

Digital Photograper - - Contents -

En­sure sharp images when shoot­ing in ur­ban places with a tri­pod ban

DIF­FI­CULTY LEVEL: In­ter­me­di­ate TIME TAKEN: One hour

So you’ve planned a trip to the big city with the aim of shoot­ing some stun­ning low-light vis­tas of the sky­scrapers and twin­kling lights from a high view­point. Most cities have at least one great van­tage point, usu­ally the top of a tall build­ing, and in many cases they’ve be­come pop­u­lar tourist at­trac­tions be­cause of the amaz­ing view. Un­for­tu­nately, for se­ri­ous pho­tog­ra­phers, there’s of­ten a frus­trat­ing catch – no tripods al­lowed. Dur­ing the day this isn’t a prob­lem, be­cause you can just hand­hold. But once the sun sets and light lev­els start to drop, so do the shut­ter speeds, and be­fore long, tak­ing sharp shots with­out some kind of sup­port be­comes tricky. You can set your lens to its widest aper­ture, turn on im­age sta­bil­i­sa­tion and hike up the ISO, but by the time blue hour ar­rives and the scene is look­ing its best, none of these steps will solve the prob­lem.

The aim of this tu­to­rial is to look at how you can over­come a tri­pod ban and still pro­duce great low-light cityscapes – with­out be­ing evicted from the premises! Our weapon of choice to do that is a nifty ac­ces­sory called The Platy­pod Pro Max, and as you’ll see, it works a treat.

BelowNEW YORK CITY BLUE HOUR IT WOULD HAVE BEEN VIR­TU­ALLY IM­POS­SI­BLE TO TAKE A SHARP IM­AGE OF THIS AMAZ­ING LOW-LIGHT SCENE FROM THE TOP OF THE ROCK­E­FELLER CEN­TRE IN NEW YORK CITY WITH­OUT A STA­BLE CAM­ERA SUP­PORT. THE PLATY­POD PRO MAX SERVED TO PRO­VIDE THAT SUP­PORTALL IMAGES © LEE FROST

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